The Perfect Family Case Study

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Her idea of the perfect family was influenced by a cultural idea that was prominent in the United States that the ideal family included traditional gender roles with a husband who worked and provided for the family, a wife who stayed home and took care of the kids, and children. Her husband worked and played music, she stayed at home and took care of the children and the house, and they were involved in a church (Eller, 91). However, one day Ms. Davis 's husband came to her and told her that he was pretty sure he was gay. They went to marriage counseling at their church but soon after that he packed his bags and left. Ms. Davis had to move out of the house that they were living in and live with her mother again for a while who had moved to…show more content…
Davis saved enough money to buy a small old farm house and barn with a little bit of land for her and Rosa. At this time both her older children had already moved out and were living on their own. It was a bit far for her to drive for work, but she said that she felt it was worth it to have a place of her own. They didn 't have a washer or drier so they had to wash their clothes by hand and hang them out to dry. Their house was really close to some farm land so Ms. Davis told Rosa to make sure not to hang her under clothes outside because she didn 't want some stranger to see her underwear. Her daughter forgot and hung all the clothes out on the line and that was how she met her current husband Pete. Ms. Davis and Pete did not really talk much after this incident, except to exchange names and pleasantries, until one day Ms. Davis discovered that she had a chipmunk living in the walls of her room. When she saw him the next day she asked if he might be able to set up a live trap for the chipmunk, he agreed to do it and from then on they started talking and eventually started to…show more content…
While some of these larger farms offered to buy milk at prices that did not even cover their costs, however, the smaller dairy farmers, including Pete, decided they would rather dump out their milk than accept a deal from the larger dairy farms. In their eyes it was essentially giving the larger dairy farms permission to walk over them and cheat them out of their earnings. Loosely speaking, Pete practices a form of pastoralism, he and his family breed and raise cattle and sell the milk they get from the cattle for profit (Eller, 132). The farm and cattle belong to his mother and she plans on turning them over to him and his brother when she dies. However, with the switch to industrialism this even effects animal farming because larger farms are able to buy out land and use more advanced technology which enables them to control the milk prices which gives them an advantage over the smaller farms. Unfortunately, because of this struggle many small family farms do not make it. For example, Pete 's brother doesn 't feel as though their small farm is profitable enough, so he has had to find another
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