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The Parenting In Frankenstein And Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

When Al Capone was born on January 17, 1899, nobody thought he would grow up to be one of the most notorious mobsters in all of crime history. Not many assumptions are made towards newborn babies, but the parenting that lies ahead determines its place in society. There are also many brilliant minds that grew up to be known for hard work and dedication. For example, the famous Steve Jobs was born an unknown man, but made himself known with the company Apple. His parents always supported his adventures in technology, especially his mom. His mom always had food ready for his group to continue their quest for new technology. Paul and Clara Jobs, his parents, always supported him and pushed him to work hard in school, which eventually led him to…show more content…
The “clean slate” is shown in Frankenstein by Mary Shelley when the monster is born. Society and the bad persona wrapped around the monster creates a horrific atmosphere around his character. But, this creature could be seen as an outcast looking for his creator. In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, she portrays two perspectives of how one is born, evil or with a clean mindset. Victor Frankenstein views his creation as a disgrace to society and believes that it was born evil. Right when the monster was created, Victor couldn’t bare to see his face and what he had made. The evidence of his violence can be seen when he kills William, Henry, and Elizabeth. During his death, the monster says “...this death will carry despair to him, and a thousand other miseries shall torment and destroy him” (Shelley 122). The monster is exhibited exploding in a burst of anger and killing an innocent sibling of Victor. The angerness and dialogue between the Creation and William prove to Victor that he created an evil hearted beast, one that should’ve been put to death. After the monster heard that William was related to Victor, he said “ ‘Frankenstein! You…show more content…
Since the creation was born, he has been suppressed by society and only portrayed from Victor’s perspective. The only time that the monster get’s to show his perspective is when he portrays his reason for killing William and the moments leading up to it. The creation explains, “At this time a slight sleep relieved me from the pain of reflection, which was disturbed by the approach of a beautiful child, who came running into the recess which I had chosen, with all the sportiveness of infancy” (Shelley 121). The monster is attempting to create an innocence for himself by stating that William was a “beautiful” child, one that the monster adored. He also says that he was interrupted from rest by William, which he is implying may have triggered his anger. When the monster suddenly stumbled upon William, he said “Child, what is the meaning of this? I do not intend to hurt you; listen to me” (Shelley 122). William automatically jumps to the assumption that the monster wants to inflict harm upon him, and that the monster could only express his feelings with violence. William put his hands over his eyes, explaining that he thought the monster was horrific to look upon and could not see the innocence of the monster. The monster seeks to educate William which is the reason that he grabbed him and hopes that he can see that he was never insisting to show evil, but calmness. The nature of the
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