preview

The PHP Autism Center of Richland

analytical Essay
1602 words
1602 words
bookmark

University
Socialization with others can help children on the Autism Spectrum utilize the skills they’ve learned in therapy and apply them to everyday situations by providing one-on-one social situations, small group social skills training, and specifically designed programs to enhance learning for the children.
The PHP (peers helping peers) Autism Center of Richland would be a great asset to our community by helping individuals on the Autism Spectrum (AS) interact with their peers through social skills modeling, coaching and direct instruction. This will help them greatly by teaching them the social and communication skills they will need to transition better into the world around them. Individuals on the Autism Spectrum benefit from positive interaction with their peers, from having role models and friends, and from the idea that they have not been isolated, shunned or pushed aside because of their inability to socialize normally in everyday situations. Implementing this program will build the children’s confidence and social skills, and may help remove the stigma of being a “special student,” and fosters understanding among nondisabled peers. (Bennett, 1999)
Disability is a natural part of the human experience and in no way diminishes the right of individuals to live independently, enjoy self-determination, make choices, contribute to society, pursue meaningful careers, enjoy full inclusion and integration in the economic, political, social, cultural, and educational mainstream of American society. (Shipley, 2002) Children on the Autism Spectrum (AS) learn social interaction skills through modeling, coaching, and direct-instruction. The negative behaviors that isolate children from being accepted by peers are shaped into socia...

... middle of paper ...

...a.com/assets/docs/behavioral-health-series/autism/2012/socialSkills.pdf
Bennett, W., Finn, C., Cribb, J. (1999) The educated child: A parent’s guide from preschool through eighth grade. (pp.465, 477-478)New York. The Free Press.
Greenspan, S., Weider, S. (2006) Engaging autism. (p.219)Cambridge, MA. Da Capo Press.
Kapp, S., Gillespie-Lynch, K., Sherman, L.E., Hutman, T. (2013) Deficit, difference or both? Autism and neurodiversity. doi: 10.1037/a0028353
Laugeson, E., Frankel, F., Gantman, A., Dillon, A., Mogil, C. (2011) Evidence-based social skills training for adolescents. doi: 10.1007/s10803-011-1339-1 with Autism Spectrum Disorders: The UCLA PEERS Program
Shipley, T. (2002).Child Care Centers and Children with Special Needs: Rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Journal Of Law & Education, 31(3), 327-49.

In this essay, the author

  • Explains the importance of developing friendship networks, including identifying relevant peer groups and extra-curricular activities, to find sources of potential friends.
  • Explains how to handle verbal teasing, including distinguishing it from embarrassing feedback, and using appropriate behavioral responses.
  • Describes bennett, finn, cribb, and bennett. the educated child: a parent’s guide from preschool through eighth grade.
  • Explains shipley, t., "child care centers and children with special needs: rights under the americans with disabilities act and section 504 of the rehabilitation act."
  • Argues that socialization with others can help children on the autism spectrum utilize the skills they’ve learned in therapy and apply them to everyday situations.
  • Explains that autism self-advocates within the neurodiversity, or autism rights, movement celebrate autism as inseparable from identity and challenge efforts to find a cure for it.
  • Explains peer exiting strategies, including how to assess receptiveness during peer entry, and what to do when these attempts fail.
  • Opines that providing one-on-one social situations, small group social skills training, and specifically designed programs can enrich the community as well as the individual.
  • Explains kapp, s, gillespie-lynch, k, sherman, l.e., hutman, t, and laugeson, e.
Get Access