The Nature Of Human Avarice In Ben Jonson's Volpone

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The Nature of Human Avarice In Ben Jonson's Volpone

By

Abdel Karim Ibrahim Rawashdeh

P.O. Box 9873
Department of English
Princess Alia College
El - Balqa Applied University
Amman, Jordan e-mail: 503@bau.edu.jo

kareem.rawashdeh@Gmail.com

The Nature of Human Avarice In Ben Jonson's Volpone

Throughout history, avarice has always been an important topic in works of literature. This human desire for more of something and the craving to accumulate more and more wealth; and to hold on to what one has accumulated has always been the focus point of writers since the Greek antiquity and the myth of Midas' lust for gold is a case in point. The goal of this
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Celia and Bonario, like Faithful Few, function as virtuous figures whose behaviour provides a standard by which to judge the world of the play. The last set is Volpone and Mosca, who victimize both the “estates” and the virtues ( Dessen 81 ). Because satire is his object, Ben Jonson therefore has to begin with a character or a group of characters fitted to his lash. He then places them in a certain situation to show them at their worst, and by a prodigious intellectual mastery contrives the complete series of their logical development into successive scenes ( McDonald 14 ). Jonson's depiction of humans in society disturbs us, for he is pessimistic about the penalties of Adam. His characters are rarely better off at the end than at the beginning of his comedies, and those who accidentally profit do so only financially. The Jonsonian world is static and confined, hardly subject even to change. The characters are flat that they have very little change in mood and motive. They are different from Shakespeare's characters that develop and surprise us ( Parteidge 63 ). Russ McDonald states

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