The Morality of the U.S. Bombing Hiroshima

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The Morality of the U.S. Bombing Hiroshima On August 6 and 9, 1945, the only atomic bombs ever used in warfare were dropped on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The mass destruction and numerous deaths caused by those bombs ultimately put an end to World War II. Was this the only way to end the war, however? Could this killing of innocent Japanese citizens had been avoided and the war still ended quickly. This paper will go into this controversial topic. First, a summary of the events leading up to the bombing and the events that followed: With the end of the European war, the Allies focused their efforts on Japan. Though they were losing miserably, the Japanese continued to fight back. The Potsdam Proclamation was issued to the Japanese. It made no mention of Japan's central surrender condition, the status of the Emperor. In Japan, the Emperor was viewed as a god. Therefore, Japan rejected the Potsdam Proclamation. The United States dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Russia declared war against Japan. Japan, because of its military, still refused to surrender. The Japanese government voted against surrender. Japanese believe in "death before dishonor." Japanese peace advocates feared for the safety of the Emperor. They begged him to break with tradition and make government policy by 2 calling for peace now. As a result of the Emperor's call to surrender, the entire Japanese cabinet, including the military, agreed to surrender. The cabinet saw that this would allow the Emperor to be retained. The Japanese would have fought to the death if they did not feel the Emperor would have been spared. Th... ... middle of paper ... ...Atomic Bomb and the Architecture Of an American Myth. Alfred A. Knopf: New York, 1995. Fasching, Darrel J. The Ethical Challenge of Auschwitz and Hiroshima Apocalypse or Utopia?. State University of New York Press: Albany, 1993. Schull, William J. Effects of Atomic Radiation A Half-Century of Studies From Hiroshima and Nagasaki. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.: New York, 1995. Bibliography: WORKS CITED Alperovitz, Gar. The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb and the Architecture Of an American Myth. Alfred A. Knopf: New York, 1995. Fasching, Darrel J. The Ethical Challenge of Auschwitz and Hiroshima Apocalypse or Utopia?. State University of New York Press: Albany, 1993. Schull, William J. Effects of Atomic Radiation A Half-Century of Studies From Hiroshima and Nagasaki. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.: New York, 1995.
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