“The Love She Still Continued to Believe in… But Love was Undependable”: The Reality of Sex Slavery in the Present Day Presented in Margaret Atwoo...

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In Margaret Atwood’s novel, Oryx and Crake, Atwood continually puts the reader into an uncomfortable environment. The story takes part in a not so distant future where the world as we know it today no longer exists due to and unknown catastrophe. The only human being that remains is a man who calls himself the Abdominal Snowman, Snowman for short, but in his younger childhood days his name was Jimmy. If the thought of being all alone in the world is not uneasy enough, Atwood takes this opportunity to point out the flaws of the world in which we live in through Snowman reminiscing on Jimmy’s childhood. The truth exposed are events people do not want to acknowledge: animal abuse for human advancement, elimination of human interaction due to technology, and at the core of the novel is the disturbing imagery and truth that slavery is still present in the world. Modern day slavery is an unsettling topic that has remained undercover for far too long. However, the truth is exposed in the traumatic story of Oryx. In order to understand the troubled societies of today Atwood unmask the dark world of childhood slavery, but she gives subtle insights on how to change the world for the better before it is too late. Snowman lives in a world of isolation and hopelessness; however, the world was not always that way. Before a catastrophic epidemic broke out and annihilated the entire human race the world was very similar to the United States in 2014. Children attend school, educators push children to understand math and sciences, and parents are wrapped up in their own desires professionally that they ignore their children. Nevertheless, the book is obviously science-fiction in the fact that the citizens either live in high security comp... ... middle of paper ... ...ice of love parents are forced to make- killing their own child or selling them into a life people do not understand. This decision of love should never have to be made. Even with all the events Oryx incurred in her life she was able to make it clear how corrupted the world is when it comes to love: Of course (said Oryx), having a money value was no substitute for love. Every child should have love, every person should have it. She herself would rather have had her mother’s love – the love she still continued to believe in… but love was undependable, it came and then it went, so it was good to have money value, because then at least those who wanted to make a profit from you would make sure you were fed enough and not damaged too much. Also there were many who had neither love nor money value, and having one of these things was better than having nothing. (126)

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