The Little Rock Nine

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“It was like going into battle every day.” This is what Ernst Green said about his experience at Central High School (Stone). Ernst Green was one of the nine African Americans that were carefully chosen to take part in the desegregation of Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas (Little Rock). The Nine African American students that were picked for this brave action were called the Little Rock Nine. These students were a massive part in the Civil Rights Movement. Little Rock, Arkansas, like many southern cities, was very segregated. The nine students went through a lot of hardships, but in the end it all worked out. Even though Arkansas was extremely segregated like all of the other southern states, an NAACP member said that this state would be the “brightest prospect among the southern states for integration”. The University of Arkansas was the first southern university to choose to have a black student attend their school. The relationship between blacks and whites was decent for a southern state at this time. In Little Rock, the state capital, a little bit of integration had been made in public places. Some of the stores in downtown Little Rock took the signs off of drinking fountains; also, the city zoo and the library started a little bit of integrating (Kirk). A major step for desegregation in Little Rock was the integration of city buses. There were no problems with the desegregation of city buses. Integrating schools in Little Rock was a whole different story. In 1954, the US Supreme Court ruled that segregated schools were illegal. Brown v. Board of Education was the case that caused the overturning of Plessy v. Ferguson and outlawed segregated schools (Kirk). Three years after this court case, the Central High Sc... ... middle of paper ... ...ttle Rock Nine got harassed day in and day out but they stuck to it and persevered. As much as the white students and parents didn’t want to accept it, they had to because integration will become a normal thing. Works Cited "Little Rock School Desegregation (1957)." Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Global Freedom Struggle. The Martin Luther King Research and Education Institute, n.d. Web. 21 Apr. 2014. Stone, Andrea. "In Little Rock, a Small Act of Defiance Endures." USA TODAY. Aug. 29 2007: n.p. SIRS Issues Researcher. Web. 24 Apr. 2014. Kirk, John A. "Crisis at Central High." History Today (London, England) Vol. 57, No. 9. Sept. 2007: 23-30. SIRS Issues Researcher. Web. 24 Apr. 2014. Smiley, Glenn E. "Report on Little Rock." Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Global Freedom Struggle. The Martin Luther King Research and Education Institute, n.d. Web. 21 Apr. 2014.

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