The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

2727 Words11 Pages
The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe is the first of several novels in the C.S. Lewis’s Chronicles of Narnia. These books tell stories of another universe that is called Narnia. Here there are many unearthly things from talking animals and evil witches. The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe is the story of four young siblings who discover this new world by entering a wardrobe. Little did they know, they were destined to become the new royalty of Narnia but only after going through many battles. In The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, C.S. Lewis analyzes the character Lucy, the theme of good versus evil, and the parallels of Narnia to other literature and Lewis’s life. In this book, Lucy is one of the children featured as protagonist. Her name came from C.S. Lewis’s goddaughter, Lucy Barfield. Throughout the book, the view point is almost always from Lucy (Emerson). She was even the first to find the wardrobe leading into Narnia (Lewis 8). Emerson said, “So in a sense, at least The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe is Lucy’s story” (Emerson). Lucy has an innocence and goodness. These are her strengths. They directly influence the people around her to clearly see her as an extraordinary and trustworthy young girl (Emerson). These qualities eventually lead her to become known as Queen Lucy the Valiant (Miller). In Narnia, all citizens had been charged to turn in any Sons of Adam or Daughters of Eve to the White Witch. Mr. Tumnus, a faun and the first creature Lucy met in Narnia, was a kidnapper for the White Which (Lewis 19). After Mr. Tumnus spent time with Lucy he could not allow himself to turn her in (Emerson). He did not turn her into the White Witch because he could not bring himself to turn in an innocent little girl ... ... middle of paper ... ...Narnia." Mythlore 28.1-2 (2009): 113+. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 24 Jan. 2012. Patterson, Nancy-Lou. "Always Winter and Never Christmas: Symbols of Time in Lewis' Chronicles of Narnia." Mythlore 18.1 (Autumn 1991): 10-14. Rpt. in Children's Literature Review. Ed. Tom Burns. Vol. 109. Detroit: Gale, 2005. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 24 Jan. 2012. Pietrusz, Jim. "Rites of Passage: The Chronicles of Narnia and the Seven Sacraments." Mythlore 14.4 (Summer 1988): 61-63. Rpt. in Children's Literature Review. Ed. Tom Burns. Vol. 109. Detroit: Gale, 2005. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 24 Jan. 2012. Russell, James. "Narnia as a site of national struggle: marketing, Christianity, and national purpose in the Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe." Cinema Journal 48.4 (2009): 59+. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 25 Jan. 2012
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