The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis

2928 Words12 Pages
In C.S. Lewis’s The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, Lewis emphasizes the three points of philosophy, themes, and symbolism throughout his writing. Lewis was a strong Christian man, and wanted to make children see and understand all the stories of the Bible. Therefore, he put Christian elements through his books, but with fantasy characters as well. Especially in this story, Lewis conveys the differences between good and evil. Aslan is represented as Christ just as the White Witch represents the sense of evil. Lewis wrote several books in this Narnia series, but The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe became the most famous and recognized of his novels. C.S. Lewis became one of the most prominent Christian writers in contemporary British society, not only because of his devotion to Christ, but also because his stories were so outstanding (Hitchens). Lewis wrote both fantasy and Christian books, which were both connected to each other in their own way. He used Christian elements to write fantasy stories, and vice versa (Langford). When he began to write The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, he placed the story with four children that had to move out of their own house during the air raids (Hannay). In chapter one, the book tells us: “This story is about something that happened to them when they were sent away from London during the war because of air-raids. They were sent to the house of an old Professor who lived in the heart of the country, ten miles from the nearest post office. He had no wife and he lived in a very large house with a housekeeper called Mrs. Macready and three servants” (Lewis 1). When the actual adventure begins, one of the four children entered the wardrobe’s doors while playing hide and seek with her sibl... ... middle of paper ... ...oit: Gale, 2005. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 12 Jan. 2012 Patterson, Nancy-Lou. "Always Winter and Never Christmas: Symbols of Time in Lewis' Chronicles of Narnia." Mythlore 18.1 (Autumn 1991): 10-14. Rpt. in Children's Literature Review. Ed. Tom Burns. Vol. 109. Detroit: Gale, 2005. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 12 Jan. 2012. Pietrusz, Jim. "Rites of Passage: The Chronicles of Narnia and the Seven Sacraments." Mythlore 14.4 (Summer 1988): 61-63. Rpt. in Children's Literature Review. Ed. Tom Burns. Vol. 109. Detroit: Gale, 2005. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 12 Jan. 2012. Walsh, Chad. "The Parallel World of Narnia." The Literary Legacy of C. S. Lewis. New York, N.Y.: Harcourt Brace Jonavich, 1979. 123-157. Rpt. in Children's Literature Review. Ed. Tom Burns. Vol. 109. Detroit: Gale, 2005. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 12 Jan. 2012.
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