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The Life of Galileo and the Effects of his Findings on Faith

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The Life of Galileo and the Effects of his Findings on Faith Galileo Galilei was born in Pisa, February 18, 1564. At an early age, Galileo was interested in mathematics and the study of mechanics. His father, a onetime mathematician, pushed him towards the medical profession, which held much greater financial benefits. But the attempts of Galileo’s father were in vein as Galileo soon discovered the works of Archimedes and became extremely interested. Thus, his father reluctantly allowed the young Galileo to pursue the study of mathematics and science. Although many remember Galileo as an astronomer, his chief contributions to the world of knowledge were in the dynamic and mechanical fields of science. The first of his many discoveries came in 1581 as a student of the University of Pisa. As Galileo was attending services at the University of Pisa, he studied the varying oscillations of a swinging chandelier in the cathedral of Pisa. Galileo reasoned that the time of each swing was the same regardless of amplitude. Galileo continued his study at the University of Pisa where he held the chair in mathematics from 1589 – 1592. Shortly after his study at the University of Pisa, Galileo took advantage of the famous Leaning Tower of Pisa, and began to study the behavior of falling bodies. At this time, nearly all scholars followed the teachings of Aristotle that the rate of fall was proportional to the weight of the body. But Galileo stated Aristotle’s false conclusions were drawn from the fact that air resistance slowed the fall of light objects that had relatively large areas to disperse air around. Galileo hypothesized those objects heavy and compact enough to reduce the effects of air resistance small enough to... ... middle of paper ... ...den City, New York: Double Day and Company, Inc., 1985 BIBLIOGRAPHY - Asimov, Isaac. Asimov’s Biographical Encyclopedia of Science and Technology. Garden City, New York: Double Day and Company, Inc., 1985 - Cohen, I. Bernard. Revolution in Science. Cambridge Massachusetts: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1985 - Knight, David. The Age of Science. New York, New York: Basil Blackwell Inc., 1986 - Redondi, Pietro. Galileo: Heretic. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1987 - Spangenburg, Ray and Diane K. Moser. The History of Science from the Ancient Greeks to the Scientific Revolution. New York, New York: Facts on File, Inc., 1993. - Spangenburg, Ray and Diane K. Moser. The History of Science in the Eighteenth Century. New York, New York: Facts on File, Inc., 1993
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