The Leading Causes Of Death During The Industrial Revolution

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Sadly what many if not all the people who migrated to the cities did not realize was that they were bringing poverty, sickness, and death along for the ride. "This growth had enormous consequences. Death rates were high, and far worse in cities than in the countryside" (Robinson 1). One of the leading causes of death during the Industrial Revolution were the conditions people had to work with. For the first generation of workers—from the 1790s to the 1840s—working conditions were very tough, and sometimes tragic. Most laborers worked 10 to 14 hours a day, six days a week, with no paid vacation or holidays. Each industry had safety hazards too; the process of purifying iron, for example, demanded that workers toiled amidst temperatures as high as 130 degrees…show more content…
"Industrialization comes with pollution. Factories, automobiles and aircrafts produces unthinkable air pollution to some advanced cities in the world. Chemicals and wastes that were not properly disposed causes water and land pollution. The condition of the environment is at stake because of the industrialization" (Apecsec.org 2). Many of the fumes and filth that was pumped into the air caused many illness and deaths. Many people were unable to work because that became sick due to all the disgusting particles that filled the cities air. Midway through the Revolution machines started take the place of the workers because many of the workers were getting sick and dying; which led to even more poverty. “Some machines took the place of human labor resulting to high unemployment rate for those people who lack competencies and skills. Because of this, those who cannot look for a better job to earn for living were forced to commit crime just to support their families" (3). When the Industrial Revolution began, the terrible uncontrollable cycle of life also started, though no one saw it
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