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The Lamb By William Blake Analysis

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“The Lamb” by William Blake, pg 120

In William Blake 's Songs of Innocence and Experience, the fierce tiger and the gentle lamb define childhood by setting a contrast between the two very different states of the human soul. “The Lamb” is written in a way that would be suitable for a very young audience. “The Lamb” is one of the simplest poems that William Blake wrote. The symbolic meaning of innocence can easily be found throughout the poem. “The Lamb” starts with an innocent directness and a natural world with no visible signs of adults. William Blake addresses the lamb itself, saying it is pure, innocent and it is associated with Christ. William Blake describes the lamb exactly as he sees it. The lamb has been blessed with soft and warm
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SparkNotes, n.d. Web. 01 Oct. 2014. <http://www.sparknotes.com/poetry/blake/section1.rhtml>.
"Songs of Innocence and of Experience Summary and Analysis." Songs of Innocence and of Experience Study Guide : Summary and Analysis of "The Lamb" N.p., n.d. Web. 03 Oct. 2014. <http://www.gradesaver.com/songs-of-innocence-and-of-experience/study-guide/section4/
"The Lamb ' William Blake." World News. N.p., n.d. Web. 02 Oct. 2014. <http:// wn.com/the_lamb%27__william_blake>.

“On Anothers Sorrow” by William Blake, pg 124-125 “On Anothers Sorrow” by William Blake, was written in 1789 as another one of his Songs of Innocence. William Blake wrote this poem separating it into two different parts. Initially, he focuses on questions about compassion. Then he focuses on the empathy and compassion of God, while also trying to answer the questions that were mentioned in the first part of the poem. The beginning line of the poem is, “Can I see another’s woe, and not be in sorrow too?” William Blake first asks whether one can witness another person’s sorrow and not refrain from feeling sorrowful too. William Blake ask the question repeatedly in the first two stanzas before he gives the answer later in the third stanza, “No, never can it
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For Blake, God is like the human in that He also feels the inevitable sorrow that comes with somebody else’s pain. “He doth feel the sorrow too.” The reader becomes aware of a divine force inside of himself, something he should not search for elsewhere. The final stanza of the poem concludes that God’s compassion for the human being, his creation, has the power to rid us of our suffering. God will not desert us, and will in fact “sit by us and moan” when we suffer.

Citations

""On Anothers Sorrow" by William Blake." Stuff Jeff Reads. N.p., n.d. Web. 02 Oct. 2014. <http://stuffjeffreads.wordpress.com/2014/03/08/on-anothers-sorrow-by-william-blake/>.
"Songs of Innocence and of Experience Summary and Analysis." Songs of Innocence and of Experience Study Guide : Summary and Analysis of "On Another 's Sorrow" Grade Saver, n.d. Web. 02 Oct. 2014. <http://www.gradesaver.com/songs-of-innocence-and-of-
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