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The Joys of Mediocrity

Satisfactory Essays
The Joys of Mediocrity

"Why do I look fat?"

"Why is the shape of my face not proportional to my body?"

"Why do I have so many pimples?"

"Why is my nose that big?"

You and I have, at some point, grumbled like this -- it could have happened last month, last week, or even just five minutes ago! We never forgave ourselves for those flaws in our physical structure called imperfections.

Most of us strive to become the person of what fashion magazines, movies, or pop culture in general proclaim as the "ideal physique of man." The beau ideal meant good looks, prominence of height, well-toned bodies, and the like. Lacking in one or more of these qualities suggests that you aren't qualified to be with the elite who dominate the world because 'the world' considers them elegant and glamorous -- simply, they are 'perfect.' So we do what we can to prove them wrong. It's easy to see because it's everywhere around us. Ladies copy the latest fashion trend, while men attempt to look and act what they think is the 'in' thing. And there's always the beauty products and modern technology to work everything else out. No, nothing wrong with doing these -- every person has the right to do so. The question is "For what real purpose is it about?" Has society been so judgmental, so vainglorious that it casts its eyes down to anyone who doesn't meet their expectations? Do we have to punish ourselves-by not valuing time, money, and self-worth-for something only temporary?

Imperfection is normal. No one escapes it-not even the most well-bred. We are only human. Or in a more philosophical sense perhaps we were meant to be created this way, to counterbalance what we have and what we don't have.

When you closely look at it, imperfection is not such a big deal. It's what that's in you that truly counts. Does perfection even exist? Most of the greatest people that ever lived were recognized for their remarkable achievements, not for how they look like. And besides, if all in this world were perfect, nothing will be regarded with appreciation anymore. A flaw actually makes an object look more appealing and precious, because you see the finer features beneath.
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