The Importance of Surroundings in Siddhartha by Herman Hesse and The Stranger by Albert Camus

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The Importance of Surroundings in Siddhartha by Herman Hesse and The Stranger by Albert Camus According to John Locke, people begin their lives with a clean slate and are nurtured by their surroundings and contact with others, also known as Tabula Rasa (Landry). In Siddhartha by Herman Hesse and The Stranger by Albert Camus, both Siddhartha and Meursault, respectively, affect this concept of Tabula Rasa, which makes each of the men who he ultimately becomes. Part of this theory is that a change of location can and will alter who a person becomes. In conjunction with his own unhappiness and the views of others around him, Siddhartha moves from place to place in the novel in a cyclical movement.

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