The Importance Of Social Media

1384 Words6 Pages
In this new age of social media and sharing information controlling who can observe your online presence becomes difficult. With increasing frequency acquaintances, employers, and colleges are turning to social media to better see what a person is really like. Searching social media platforms for additional information on applicants to schools and jobs is becoming a standard step in the college admissions process. When it comes to this step most will readily agree that there are benefits, including a more comprehensive image of an applicant. This agreement ends, however, with the question of whether or not looking at social media sites such as Facebook is ethical. When taking all arguments into account the one in favor of colleges considering…show more content…
In general social media portrays a less manufactured image of the applicant. This view is difficult to grasp from a list of test scores, grades, awards, extracurricular activities, and an essay. A more comprehensive portrayal of an applicant does not only aid admissions offices in accepting the best equipped students but also helps students to attend the colleges best for them. People tend to function best in an environment they feel comfortable in. Students are more likely to succeed at a college that focuses on similar values to him or her as open-mindedness and thus openness to learning can be achieved through this common ground. The applicant who volunteers and a school that has opportunities from continuing this become a clearer match. Similarly, if the student would be able to continue a sport, he or she is more likely to enjoy the college experience by becoming involved in the school through athletics as well as academics. Additionally, the admissions method also makes students more responsible for their own actions. Common sense seems to dictate that an applicant who is responsible online is responsible academically and in his or her community. Though online persona is not always a direct representation of offline personality, it is close enough for the purposes of college admissions. This makes social media a viable resource in the acceptance process. If privacy is the only concern, steps can be taken to fulfill such a priority. Should a skewed portrayal be the complaint, similar steps can be taken to correct this as well. The argument in favor of social media research is more persuasive as the numerous benefits outweigh the fixable
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