The Importance Of Organizational Change

991 Words4 Pages
The most important factor critical to the success of organizational changes especially with mergers, reengineering, and downsizing is communication. Management must be open and changes must be communicated with everyone within an organization to avoid criticism. Communication should be well-thought out and the intended audience must be taken into separate considerations. This will lessen frustration caused by feelings of not being in control. All members in the organization would want to be a part of organizational change rather than feeling like a bystander or even worse, a victim. Other factors that can affect communication are the language used as well as the gender and emotions of the individuals as well as existing power structures.…show more content…
Consistency of the Coach, making sense of things with the Interpreter, and also recognizing certain differences under the Navigator are the keys to making an organizational change a more efficient transition. Every situation is different and that becomes exponential when more things (employees) are added. This Navigator style allows to address those differences and then approach them in their specific way. Upper management, executives, and others do not require the same level of information. Gender differences should also be taken into account. Moving across international borders and into different cultural settings can not be ignored and the Navigator allows these differences to be approached. Not only does this give an impression of customization but also gives more weight to folks buying-in. The Coach with the Interpreter also continues to add to that by presenting a team thought with all this once again, offering a group mentality with all involved with the change while being consistent, and just as important; making it make sense. People will not buy-in unless they think they understand. And by being made to feel special they will also have a feeling of being understood and appreciated. Misunderstandings and criticisms will be held at a minimum and this is possibly the greatest result of the approach. One thousand "goods" can be sunk with one horrible "bad". Risk management is the concern there. I am convinced this combination is the recipe to administer organizational change in the best way
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