The Importance Of Oral Language And Written Language

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As a dual immersion teacher in the Spanish language, I see a dilemma through the years and have wondered how I can help these learners achieve the necessary skills and be on a first grade level by the end of the school year, especially the English native speakers. As Frey and Fisher (2010), states that Letter and word recognition must be further coordinated with the auditory areas of the brain that process the sounds of language and assemble them into meaningful strings. Therefore, the loop of the language processing and language comprehension how Frey and Fisher (2010) calls must be trained to coordinate efficiently. This is where my review of the questions comes forward. After analyzing the literature review and the comments of my peers,…show more content…
Once more, my action research question is based on the connection between the student oral language and written language. Therefore, as Hill and Launder (2010) mentions that children’s awareness of phonology, particularly rhyme and alliteration, was found to have a powerful effect in their eventual success in learning to read. Phonological skills, particularly rhyming, enable children to make analogies when learning to read and this is important in alphabetic literacy where there is a grapheme-to-phoneme…show more content…
This is the goal I want to achieve as a teacher and shows a relationship to my action research question. Apthorp, Randel, Cherasaro, Clark, McKeown, & Beck, (2012) research suggests that children’s oral vocabulary in preschool, kindergarten, and first grade predicts future reading achievement in both later elementary grades and high school. Together with, It is the oral vocabularies of emergent readers that first allow them access to meaning when applying letter-sound correspondences which is the dilemma that I have been going through the years. How can I instruct the learners into achieving this skill? Apthorp et al. (2012) also states that difference in language exposure between children in welfare families and the children in professional families is thought to be a major contributor to differences in young children’s vocabulary repertoires, measured in thousands of words. This could be the case in my situation, I work on a low-poverty community school where a 97 % receive free-reduce lunch and free
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