The Importance Of Language In The Handmaid's Tale

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If people looked at the sky and saw it blood red every day instead of blue would it change or perspective of how we think of the world? Let's say it does, what happens to the pretty blue sky? We don’t know what would happen but we do know that if The handmaid's tales changed setting it would be very different. If The Handmaid's Tale was written in the time of the Holocaust it would differ by having a darker tone, and at times it would be elegiac for the lost words of Gilead. This would change the language of communication between each character; & would change the plots a lot. Since the book written in the 1980’s subtract about 40 years it brings us to the Holocaust time where everything we thought was bad got even worse back then. Think about…show more content…
Margaret Atwood implies that language facilitates power. From those who are allowed to read, to the right to speak or even the right to write, to those who don't have to live in the darkness of their reality. If the time difference were to make language different it would add much more makeup words, since Atwood tends to make up works and give them a significant meaning to each one. The book implies that each character has a way of education whether it's verbal talking to eye contact with signs. In the end, all of these are different ways of communicating but what if this piece of life that hasn't been taken by the government of Gilead changed? What would the handmaid do to communicate? Could they communicate by reading each others mind, or using drawing to say their emotions? What if a line, just a simple line meant the end of the world. The world consists of thousands of languages and some of us are lucky to even know two. Coming back to The Handmaid's, Leaders use language to distinguish themselves from and others in order to maintain their own power. If went away everyone would be the same because the verbal language would be used to the point where the book wouldn't be…show more content…
Atwood uses imagery a lot to get the audience to imagine the setting and characters in each chapter. But coming back to the Holocaust, if the book made scenes were some of the characters were in concentration camps, it would be darker, the chapters would be much more intense: and the things people would be forced to do would be scary. But not only at concentrations camps, the government would be much more superior than the original group. For Example in pages 93-95, the context between the Commander, Serena Joy, and Offred, was very intense because people aren't used to reading a part about people having to make a monthly ceremony to see if offred gets pregnant. Not necessarily new plots but some old plots could become more horrifying than its original
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