The Importance Of International Human Rights

1066 Words5 Pages
Moreover, according to Hanna Arendt, the magnitude of the European refugee crisis also propelled human rights to the centre of post-war international politics. Forced displacements as a result of the Second World War, the Holocaust, the Cold War and then later anticommunists escapees was on such a large scale it made a huge impact on the encountering nations, and the international enforcement and protection of innocent civilians (Hoffman, 2010). There were approximately eight million civilians who qualified as "displaced persons" under the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration, including: slave labourers, prisoners of war, liberated concentration camp inmates, with most of them being Eastern Europeans. Many of these stateless…show more content…
The World Conference on Human Rights ended with the acceptance of The Vienna Declaration Programme of Action, 1993, signed by 171 states. This was a reaffirmation of the significance of International Human Rights. (Cox, 2013). Human Rights institutions have achieved many successes over the past sixty years, for example, Amnesty International, 1961, is a global movement of 2.8 million people in over 150 countries and has campaigned against torture, the use of child soldiers, death penalty land minds, and also urged the release of 152 prisoners of conscience, and supported women 's rights (Amnesty International,…show more content…
Despite the nation having affirmed four key international human rights treaties and having a constitution that postulates a number of human rights protections (Human Rights Watch 2015). In practice, the government suppresses all forms of individual expressions of thought, including religious freedom and freedom of the press, restricts movement of its citizens: domestically and internationally, with forced settlements as punishment for political reasons, blocked any form of humanitarian aid for its citizens during the food crisis in the 1990 's and diverted the resources to its military (Haggard & Noland 2005). Subsequently, any rebellion, including attempt to leave the country, would result in imprisonment, without trial, where prisoners are subject to torture, sexual assault, forced abortions, public executions and forced slave-labour by the authorities (Bureau of Democracy; 2005;
Open Document