The Importance Of Emotions In Wuthering Heights

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People may sometimes find that their general mood and thought process is affected by their environment. This idea of settings affecting mood and reflecting a person’s emotions is clearly displayed in Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights. Bronte carefully molds the two main houses of the story, Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange, to reflect the status and thoughts of those within the houses. From the beginning of the story, it is clear that the two houses are completely opposite, though they are located within the same Yorkshire Moors. Whereas Wuthering Heights represents gloom and raw emotions, Thrushcross Grange represents class and refinement. Accordingly, their inhabitants show traits that match those of their environment, and when Catherine,…show more content…
The name Wuthering Heights further supports this idea, as the word Wuthering is described as being characteristic of the storms that occur often around it. As the first narrator, Lockwood, arrives at Wuthering Heights for the second time, he notes that the hill-top that the house is located on, “...was hard with a black frost, and the air made me shiver through every limb. Being unable to remove the (gate) chain, I jumped over, and, running up the flagged causeway bordered with straggling gooseberry bushes, knocked vainly for admittance, till my knuckles tingled and the dogs howled” (9). This encounter immediately lets the reader know that the house will be the setting for many terrible things to…show more content…
Perhaps the ultimate symbol of this corruption is Linton Heathcliff, the son of Isabella and Heathcliff. Linton is a pitiful, scatterbrained boy, who seems to be completely occupied with his own thoughts. When Heathcliff meets Linton for the first time, Linton breaks down into tears, and Heathcliff describes the boy as, “...a shame of (Linton’s) mother, never to waken your filial regard for me! You are my son, then, I’ll tell you; and your mother was a wicked slut to leave you in ignorance of the sort of father you possessed” (194). In this short dialogue between the two, the reader can infer a lot. First, Heathcliff, the owner of Thrushcross Grange, is a product of the abuses he suffered during his childhood at Wuthering Heights, which has caused him to become a violent, obsessive, and demeaning character. He later becomes a shell of himself, constantly mourning the loss of Catherine, and his transformations symbolize the change in Thrushcross Grange from a place of high class to one of as little esteem as Wuthering Heights. Also, Linton is the child of one member of each house. As he is, a small, pitiful character, he symbolizes how the intermingling between the members of Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange has caused the status of both to
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