The Horrors of War Depicted in Owen's "Dulce Et Decorum Est" and Yeats' Poem "An Irish Airman Foresees His Death"

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It is clear when a country goes to war, patriotism and support for ones’ country is obvious. After events of nine eleven, there were large amount of support given to soldiers fighting in Iraq. Banners, stickers, rallies were some ways people showed their gratitude. Little do they know, many of the strong men, who are in battle, goes through an episode where they fear death more than anything else. In the writings of William B. Yeats and Wilfred Owens, their war poems depicts an emotional load that they have encountered, to a point where death was no longer a fear but a desire.

War is not a pretty sight. On the battle field, what is seen, felt and heard isn’t fully comprehensible unless one experienced it first hand. Owen’s writing, “Dulce Et Decorum Est”, vividly describes the horrid war that he was in. Owen begins his poem by placing the reader in the environment that he was in. Lines such as, “men marched asleep”, “coughing like hags”, “haunting flares” and “limped on, blood-shod” were effective at conveying an emotional appeal. The conditions that the soldiers were in w...

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