The Hobbit Journey

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Imagine if the world was made out of candy. It would look something similar to Willy Wonka’s Chocolate Factory. This is similar to what J.R.R Tolkien did through his writing career. The Middle-Earth, the setting of his stories was illustrated through a series of books he composed. The Hobbit is the first tale that occurs in the timeline of Middle-Earth’s history. The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien tells the tale of Bilbo Bagins, a lonely man living a quiet life until he is swept into an impromptu perilous journey. One day while minding his own business, Bilbo is confronted by Gandalf, a famous wizard of great power and wisdom. From there, Bilbo is forced into hosting a dinner for the thirteen dwarves who explain how the dragon Smaug took over their kingdom and killed all the other dwarves. It is evident that the dwarves need help and Gandalf believes Bilbo can save the day. Bilbo tries to get them out of his house, but instead, Bilbo gets kicked out of his house. Thats when the journey began. From there Tolkien takes his readers on an adventure exploring his mythical adaptation of Anglo-Saxon Europe. After an influx of requests for Tolkien to continue the story, he created The Silmarillion and the Lord of the Rings series. The Lord of the Rings follows after The Hobbit as a sequel. It was split up into three books, The Fellowship of the Ring, The Twin Towers, and The Return of The King. These books detail the story of Bilbo Baggin’s son Frodo and his adventures. In The Hobbit, Bilbo find a ring that grants him invisibility, which he does not tell anyone about. At the end of Bilbo’s life, the orcs find out that Bilbo has the ring and they order a hit on him. The ring has an unfathomable power that could be used to reincarnate the evil...

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...stical properties and wrote The Hobbit, The Lord of The Rings Series, and the Silmarillion. These stories paralleled the famous Anglo-Saxon tale, Beowulf by sharing similar protagonists, antagonists, and dragons. After that, Medieval Europe and Middle-Earth shared similar geographical layouts, hill fort features, and treasure burials. Next, Middle-Earth characters and Anglo-Saxon Europeans shared the values of treasure, honor, and bravery. With the overwhelming evidence, it would simply be ignorant to say J.R.R Tolkien’s studies of Anglo-Saxon Europe had no influence over his narrative creations. Scientists say that humans’ imaginations are limited to the places, things, and feelings they have seen, felt, and experienced. Which opens up the question, can one could create something genuinely new, or would it just be a new depiction of a something previously created?
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