The Greatest Journey In The Epic Of Gilgamesh

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Throughout life, one can be defined by their greatest journey. For myself, there is the journey from being a young girl in Nepal, but now to being on the President’s List, and being months away from being a junior in college. Throughout that journey, there were several arduous obstacles that I needed to overcome. Throughout our semester, we read many pieces where the protagonist endured through an arduous journey, in order to obtain what would have otherwise been impossible. To start our series of journeys, we begin with Gilgamesh. In the Epic of Gilgamesh, one of his quests that make him an epic hero is to find immortality after Enkidu 's death. Gilgamesh was born one-third man and two-third god. This made Gilgamesh believe that he was better…show more content…
Besides heroism, the tale also depicted the multiple obstacles and challenges that he has to go through in order to achieve fame that he has now. Sundiata characterized as courageous, humbled, determined, and powerful leaders to exist in the Mali Kingdome. unfortunately, his childhood was not joyful, he was challenged with disability of not being able to walk or talk, so he did whatever it takes to accomplished his destiny while he was crowned for his father 's heirs. Throughout his explorations he did nothing other than maintaining high level of strengths and…show more content…
It’s important to appreciate the journey, as the end loses value when the journey is lessened. The author discusses the different ranking of individuals and how some are born into excellence and others does not. Kenko was a Buddhist priest, and the denomination of his work captures the quiet, contemplative essence that is characteristics of this position. His condemnations of a life of luxury reflect the Japanese accentuation on simplicity. With the influence the Buddhism, that accentuates the desideratum to free oneself of material possessions and earthly desires. The interest in the transmuting seasons and the accompanying vicissitudes in nature reflects the Japanese appreciation of perish faculty. The Japanese generally believe that people should conduct themselves in a restrained, dignified, and disciplined
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