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The Glorious Revolutions

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Plan of Investigation

The investigation is to compare and contrast the nature of two Russian Revolutions in 1917. The first Russian Revolution to be investigated will be the February Revolution wherein the poor living conditions and the dissent among the people of Russia led to the collapse of the Romanov dynasty and the rise of the Provisional Government. The second Russian Revolution to be investigated will be the Bolshevik Revolution which occurred after the failure of the provisional government to improve the living conditions in Russia and led to the Bolsheviks claiming power of Russia in October. Memoirs and university level history books will be the main sources of reference to examine the nature and results of the revolutions. Two sources used in the essay, The Russian Revolution 1917-1932 by Sheila Fitzpatrick and the compilation of documents and sources, The Russian Revolution 1917-1921 by Ronald Kowalski will then be evaluated on their origins, purpose, values, and limitations.

Summary of Evidence

The working class in Russia was heavily mistreated by the business owners. They were made sullen by extremely long hours, low pay, and the heavy inflation of food and other goods. After the 1905 revolution, Tsar Nicholas II allowed trade unions to become established in Russia. However, the government had a stake in industry, and therefore, the government was able to keep protests, and wage strikes down by using the secret police and using the army whenever necessary. The peasants wanted and demanded land reforms because they were sick of not actually owning the land and wanted to be free from the times of serfdom [see appendix VI]. Instead they had to pay a redemption tax to the state in order to pay for the ...

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...sional government wanted to get in to help the people of Russia. The books, The Russian Revolution 1917-1932 by Sheila Fitzpatrick and the compilation of documents and sources, The Russian Revolution 1917-1921 should and can be used for further research because of the valuable use of primary sources in The Russian Revolution 1917-1921 and the wide range of knowledge offered by The Russian Revolution 1917-1932.

Bibliography

Chernov, Victor. The Great Russian Revolution. New York : Russell & Russel, 1966.

Curtiss, John Shelton. The Russian Revolution of 1917. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, 1957.

Fitzpatrick, Sheila. The Russian Revolution 1917-1932. New York: Oxford University Press, 1982.

Kowalski, Ronald. The Russian Revolution 1917-1921. London: Routledge, 1997.

Stacey, F. W. Lenin and the Russian Revolutions. London: Edward Arnold Ltd, 1968.
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