The Glorious Revolution of 1688

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The Glorious Revolution of 1688 The theme of “autonomy and responsibility” is prevalent in many major wars of revolution throughout the history of the world and especially in the events that occurred in England during the seventeenth century. Autonomy is defined as self-government and existing or functioning independently. Responsibility is having obligations or duties to something and being able to distinguish between right and wrong. In England, the political leaders drove King James II out of the country in order to end his oppressive rule as an absolute monarch. The Dutch Prince William of Orange, James’ son-in-law, invaded England to rule. Parliament gave the throne to William and his wife Mary but placed restrictions on their sovereignty with the Bill of Rights. This declaration gave more power to the people and made them more responsible in government. The Glorious Revolution resulted in the Parliament and the common people of England having more autonomy and responsibility in the government. James II The people of England and the members of Parliament wanted to be free of the rule of King James II. James sought religious toleration for Catholics and he “repeatedly stated that he wanted to establish the Catholic religion.”1 The people of England feared that James II would pass on a Catholic dynasty. He was married to a Catholic wife who bore a male heir in June of 1688. He continually ignored public opinion during the last months of his reign and believed that God favored his actions.2 The two big political parties in Parliament, the Whigs and the Tories, joined together in opposition to James. The people of England elected these men to their positions, so they represented the majority opinion. ... ... middle of paper ... ...Press, 1991), 87. 5 “The Glorious Revolution.” http://landow.stg.brown.edu/victorian/history/Glorious_Revolution.html. (October 22, 2000). 6 Morrill, 84. 7 Morrill, 84. 8 Morrill, 88-89. 9 Speck, 147. 10 Speck, 141, 145-7. 11 “The Bill of Rights,” in The Revolution of 1688 and the Birth of the English Political Nation, 2nd ed., ed. Gerald M. Straka (Lexington: D.C. Heath and Company, 1973), 63. 12 “The Bill of Rights,” 63. 13 David Ogg, “The Revolution as a Reinforcement of English Institutions,” in The Revolution of 1688 and the Birth of the English Political Nation, 2nd ed., ed. Gerald M. Straka (Lexington: D.C. Heath and Company, 1973), 105. 14 Ogg, 105. 15 Jack P. Greene, Negotiated Authorities (Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1994), 81. 16 Greene, 81. 17 Greene, 82-83.

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