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The Glass Menagerie Analysis

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n Tennessee William’s drama play, The Glass Menagerie, the character Amanda is mostly concerned with her children's well being. After her husband abandoned her and their two children, Tom and Laura, Amanda had to raise both of them single-handedly until they were grown ups. Williams’ drama “involving only four characters, is built around Amanda and her effect upon raising her children” (Tholl, 1337). Amanda cared for her children's health, appearance, and future while also being concerned with what they do in their free time. Being the mother that she is, Amanda wishes nothing but “success and happiness for her precious children” (Williams 1996). Although her mothering techniques can be extreme and or suffocating to some degree, she is not oblivious to all of the dysfunctional nature of her family.
Amanda cares about the health of her children. A childhood illness has left her daughter Laura with a limp. Being aware of this “cripple”, Laura has developed a mental fragility and an inferiority complex that have isolated her from the outside world (Unknown, Amanda Wingfield). If Amanda was not a good a good mother she would not worry at all about Laura’s health and independence. Instead she continuously tells Laura that her limp is not something to be ashamed of. “Nonsense! Laura, I’ve told you never, never to use that word. Why, you’re not crippled, you just have a little defect. . .” (Williams 1985) Amanda was afraid that because Laura’s health problems she would never receive gentlemen callers because “she had to walk with a brace and was extremely shy” (Unknown, Amandaa Wingfield). Amanda begins to see beyond her daughter as a crippled and does not let any of her children mention it.
Amanda is concerned with what her children ...

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... to encourage” (Beattie, 2). It is said that Amanda’s greatest flaw is denying reality which she would often withdraw from. She longed to be “well-off” and “wouldn’t accept that she was responsible for why her children ended up this way;” and “wouldn’t accept that she was responsible for the sorrow and flaws of her children” (Unknown, Essaylet).
Amanda Wingfield cared mostly about her children's well being. Though “her foolishness makes her unwittingly cruel at times, there is tenderness in her slight person” (Fambrough, 1). Amanda cared for her children's health, appearance, and future while also being concerned with what they do in their free time. Amanda “lives only for her children for whom she sincerely wants happiness and security” (Tholl, 1336). “The key to Amanda’s character is her heroism” and had Amanda been a bad mother, she would have lived in oblivion.
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