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The Freethinking Student of Dialogic/Dialectic Learning

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Paulo Freire questions the theory that education is just a basic process consisting of just teaching between a student and teacher in Pedagogy of Hope. The text elaborates on the multiple components of teaching. Freire makes a valid point that the teaching style is an imperative factor in whether the student is able to comprehend the material. He lists four types of teaching styles. The first, authoritarian, the teacher is dispassionate to any input from the student. The second, permissive, allows the student full control of their learning with little to no teacher input. The third, intellectualism, is where the teacher is enamored and overwhelmed by the content of the teaching. The most important of the styles to Freire is dialogic/dialectic, engaging both the student and teacher in the content taught. This style is imperative to the students of today’s society because of the need to be free thinkers able to analyze critically and dialogic/dialectic is the only style with the capabilities to influence the mind.

A student and teacher should be able to openly communicate or discuss the content and/or topic in class. To begin the educating process, one must set the correct tone and setting for it. Education is supposed to be an “experience”. An experience is supposed to engage all that are involved in it. “That every reader, everyone engaged in any teaching or learning practice, explicitly wonders about his or her work as teacher or pupil, in mathematics, history, biology, or grammar classes, is of little importance. That as teacher or pupil in the experience of the critical instruction in content that all explicitly engage a “reading of the world” that would be of a political nature, is not of the highest necessity” (Freire 49). ...

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...om Pedagogy of Hope by Paulo Freire. Copyright ©1992, 2004 by Continuum International Publishing Group. Reprinted by permission of the publisher via the Copyright Clearance Center. African Diaspora and the World Readings for ADW 111, Copyright © 2011 by Spelman College.

pp. 1-4: “Crick Crack”. From Rotten Pomerack by Merle Collins. Copyright © 1992 by Little Brown Book Group. Reprinted by permission of the author and publisher. African Diaspora and the World Readings for ADW 111, Copyright © 2011 by Spelman College.

pp. 105-113: “The Complexity: “Who am I?”. From Why are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? By Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum. Copyright © 2003 by Perseus Books Group. Reprinted by permission of the publisher via the Copyright Clearance Center. African Diaspora and the World Readings for ADW 111, Copyright © 2011 by Spelman College.
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