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The Fall of the House of Usher

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A young man ran away from a heap of ruins. He had witnessed the death of his best friend and his home but he ran away as it happened. At the moment, all was silent and not even a squeak could be heard. But if a house collapsed in the middle of a forest, and no one was around to hear it, did it make a sound? With such wonders, death, and darkness also come the work of Edgar Allan Poe. Edgar Allan Poe is known as a literature legend. He wrote many complicated horror and detective fiction stories, which also represents the artsy twentieth century (“Poe” 1316). Many of his works are poems and short stories. As for his life, it started out pretty gloomily. Both of Poe’s parents had died and he was then sent to an orphanage shortly after. He was never on good terms with his foster dad, and his foster mother died of Tuberculosis (a disease that later kills his wife). After his wife died, he fell in love again but he died before his second wedding (“‘The Fall’” 52). The many deaths that he faced contributes to his many themes of gloom. “The Fall of the House of Usher” for example was told through an unnamed narrator who visited his friend Roderick after his twin (Madeline) had died, leaving him to be the last of the Usher race. As days passed, they decided to bury his sister but later realized that she was actually buried alive, and Roderick began to go insane up until the moment when the cadaverous Madeline showed up at the narrator’s bedroom door. At that moment, she collapsed onto her brother and they (along with the house) both fell dead. With the story itself, Poe uses a number of literary devices and characters to express and support his theme. In “The Fall of the House of Usher,” author Edgar Allan Poe shows that madness and insani...

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...ouse of Usher.’” American Literature Jan. 1964: 445-66. Rpt. in Short Stories for Students. Ed. Kathleen Wilson. Vol. 2. Detroit: Gale, 1997. 62-65. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 10 Oct. 2013.
“’The Fall of the House of Usher.’” Short Stories for Students. Ed. Kathleen Wilson. Vol. 2. Detroit: Gale, 1997. 51-58. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 10 Oct. 2013.
Mowery, Carl. “’The Fall of the House of Usher.’” Short Stories for Students. Ed. Kathleen Wilson. Vol. 2. Detroit: Gale, 1997. 58-62. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 8 Oct. 2013.
Poe, Edgar Allan. “The Fall of the House of Usher.” East of the Web. N.p., n.d. Web. 9 Oct. 2013. .
“Poe, Edgar Allan.” Gale Contextual Encyclopedia of American Literature. Vol. 3. Detroit: Gale, 2009. 1362-20. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 24 Sept. 2013.
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