The Effectiveness of Part Seven Chapter Nine of Graham Greene's Brighton Rock

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The Effectiveness of Part Seven Chapter Nine of Graham Greene's Brighton Rock I think that Graham Greene presents this episode very effectively. At the beginning of this chapter there is the planning and thoughts of the suicide arranged to take place that evening. As Rose and Pinkie leave the pub it hits Pinkie what is just about to happen. "He had a sudden inclination to throw up the whole thing, to get in the car and drive home, and let her live." I think this makes it more effective, and this gives the impression that maybe Pinkie has come to his senses and is going to let Rose live, and makes it seem more real. In this part of the novel I feel sympathy for Pinkie as he is confused and is not really sure what he should do. He wants to live his life free of Rose, but thinks that the only way for him to do this and not be in danger is to persuade her to kill herself. Rose then starts to become unsure. "She could always escape- if he didn't change his mind. Nothing was decided. They could go in the car wherever he wanted them to go; she could take the gun from his hand, and even then - at the last moment of all - she needn't shoot." I feel slightly angry towards Pinkie here, as you realise how it would feel to be Rose at this point in time, and that he is forcing her to do this, and she is completely oblivious to the fact that Pinkie has no intention to follow. During the end of the novel there is pathetic fallacy - it is raining which gives a better image, and gives an appropriate atmosphere. Graham Greene occasionally drops hints of hope for Rose, which makes it more effective, as you are not completely sure of the outcome. "He gave her one more chance: 'You'd have always stuck to me,' and when she nodded in agreement, he began wearily the long course of action which would one day let him be free again.

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