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The Economic Crisis In America Changed By Emilia Castanea

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When Emilia Castaneda was a young girl in the 1930 's, her entire world changed. Her father was a Hispanic male, but she was born in America. The day the Immigration and Nationalization Services (INS) came to send away her father, a problem arose. She and her brother were U. S. Citizens. Officials told her and her brother they could stay in Los Angeles. The offer came with a catch, though. They had to declare themselves orphans and become wards of the state. Emilia refused the offer saying that "she had a father". Emilia despaired in Mexico, a place she had only heard of. Her family lived in extreme poverty, often missing the home they lost. During this time, many like her died in the conditions they had to live in (Balderrama 107). Her story…show more content…
This crisis was the Great Depression. The n the midst of chaos and desperation. Western society accused Hispanics and African Americans of stealing jobs and welfare. For this reason, the United States government took drastic action to protect America 's economy. Hence the government unconstitutionally sending anyone of Mexican descent, or in proximity to the southern border, into Mexico. As the economy fixed itself and repatriated Mexican Americans returned to America, the world forgot about the Mexican Repatriation. Most schools neglected to mention the event when teaching about the Great Depression. Yet, teachers can not afford to continue ignoring this piece history with so much prevalence today. School curriculum should add lectures on the Mexican Repatriation because it presents a new side to the story of the Great Depression, could prevent history from repeating itself, and still has an impact on modern…show more content…
Kevin R. Johnson, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs for the University of California at Davis, says that the United States Government should recognize the Mexican Repatriation because of the impact that still affects Mexican Americans even now (2). Ignorance is often the source of race and civil issues, but the lack of information, this time, is not in anyone 's control. Researchers and historians are finding it difficult to find accurate statistics. Relating to more questions asked about the Mexican Americans repatriated, the U. S. Citizenship and Immigration Services tell researchers that the INS kept a small record of the Mexican Repatriation. The lack of accurate public information has caused increasing frustration. These survivors wish to educate people to aid them in comprehending their struggles. Francisco E. Balderrama states, "Knowledge about this great injustice will prevent other ethnic or racial groups from suffering the same mistreatment, especially during difficult times of social unrest and economic crisis" (109). The survivors believe that if schools educate future generations on previous acts of racial injustice, then they will not be as quick to commit those acts