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The Downfall of Man in Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe

Satisfactory Essays
I would like to comment about how Crusoe lived with himself after he became the master in a heirarchy where he was once the slave. He is so unhappy with his role of slave he takes the first opportunity given to him to escape. He also takes the first opportunity given to him to become the master of those left on the boat. This is unforgivable. He throws a man over board because he does not believe he can trust him, but he knows he can trust the first boat that sails his way. Does this sound funny to anyone else? He also offers to give all of his possetions to the captain of the boat that saves him: "I immediatlely offered all I had to the Captain of the Ship..."(204) How did he know the captain was not going to kill him and keep his possetions anyway. The captain turns down the opportunity to take Crusoe's desperate offer. However, he does offer him money for a boat that does not belong to Crusoe and the poor Boy Xury, who does not belong to anyone. How soon Crusoe forgets the horrible life of being a slave!! It is humorous how it is only those who are in the possition of master who think slavery is a good idea. Crusoe then meets Friday. He saves his life, much the way the captain saved Crusoe's life. Friday offers all he has (which is not much) to Crusoe, much like Crusoe did for the captain. However, Crusoe is too selfish to turn Friday down on his offer as the captain did. He takes advantage of the man and immediatly introduces him to slavery. Crusoe is an example of the downfall of man. Humans are sometimes so obsessed with power they only focus on who can be controlled. Whether it is separated by class, gender, color, or as Courtney said religion one group must always feel as if it has power over another. This is common theme in litersature and in life.

As I read the excerpt from Defoe's "Robinson Crusoe" in "Oronooko" I found myself confused with the point that Defoe was trying to make. Allison, I agree with you completely when you say that the actions of Crusoe "sound kind of funny." I too feel that Crusoe is an example of the downfall of man. First reading the