The Dangers of Totalitarianism: George Orwell

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Hiding in the shadows yet standing in full view, the signs of totalitarianism and the dangers that accompany it in 1984 are everywhere. Orwell is able to paint a frighteningly realistic picture of the all-consuming monster that is a totalitarian state. It tries to hide its negative traits by covering them up with promising lies that bring a good public image to the state. When a totalitarian style of government is employed, it gains control over every aspect of life for any unlucky citizen or bystander who happens to come under its reigns. George Orwell demonstrates his theme of Totalitarianism and the dangers thereof; illustrating itself throughout the entire story through everything from obvious signs such as the constant monitoring of every move a person makes, down to subtle signs such as slogans found throughout with that are more than meets the eye. Hiding in plain sight, a slogan can portray a deeper meaning than first meets the eye. Displayed ledger than life on a government building, the slogan “War is peace. Freedom is slavery. Ignorance is strength.” (7) exemplifies the hold that totalitarianism has established. This hold that has built its kingdom from the ignorance of its’ citizens. These ignorant citizens have been taught to believe what the state says is true, even if it does not logically make sense. Exemplifying this is the facet that the previously mentioned slogan is accepted as truth among the citizens in 1984. They are taught the fundamental principles of Totalitarianism through a few simple lines. In order for a state such as this one to exist, it would need to constantly be in a state of war to prevent any outside nation to infiltrate and interfere with internal affairs. A complete removal of freedoms als... ... middle of paper ... ...hoice but to concede. Life under totalitarianism is not pleasant, nor is it right that any man have to endure such a life. For the life of anybody unlucky enough to be ceased into this society has no hope, no past and no purpose except to serve and protect the state. George Orwell demonstrates his theme of Totalitarianism and the dangers thereof; illustrating itself throughout the entire story through everything from obvious signs such as the constant monitoring of every move a person makes, down to subtle signs such as slogans found throughout with that are more than meets the eye. Totalitarianism holds tight its grip on the entirety of the society found in 1984; it leaves nothing unscathed and unscarred that happens to fall into its dark, bottomless abyss. Works Cited Orwell, George, and Erich Fromm. 1984: A Novel. New York, NY: Signet Classic, 1961. Print.
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