The Dalai Lama's Five-Point-Peace Plan for Any Resistance Movement

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In the Dalai Lama’s Five Point Peace Plan, he described it as a "first step towards a lasting solution"(qtd. dalailama.com). This initial “step” towards change and a resolution is taken during the organization of any resistance movement. A resistance movement is specifically defined as an organized effort by some portion of the civil population of a country to resist the legally established government or an occupying power and to disrupt civil order and stability. A resistance movement may seek to achieve and obtain its goals through either the use of nonviolent resistance or the use of armed force, violence. I look to shed light on two important resistance movements that have often accepted violence as a pragmatic political strategy, as well as two other equally significant resistance movements that, in contrast, insist on a nonviolent strategy of action. Our initial focus sets upon a resistance movement that seeks to achieve and obtain its goals through the use of armed force and violence. The Irish Republican Army was an Irish republican revolutionary military organization that waged a guerrilla campaign against British rule in Ireland in the Irish War of Independence of 1919. The IRA’s main goal was to use armed force to drive British rule out of Ireland and to achieve an independent republic with the political help and leadership of Sinn Féin, seeking the reunification of Ireland. The Irish War of Independence was a vicious and gory affair, with violence and acts of great ruthlessness on both sides. The British sent hundreds of World War I veterans to assist the Royal Irish Constabulary, Ireland's armed police force from the early nineteenth century until 1922, to face the forces of the IRA. The IRA fought a guerrilla war aga... ... middle of paper ... ...wer is fighting for rights from a higher power. In these cases, non-violence would be the smarter method of protest and resistance, seeing as the lesser powers would need more power to succeed in carrying out the action of counter violence, as explained by Susanne Kappeler in the textbook. In conclusion, resistance movements vary in issue, leadership, opponents, demographics and strategies. Attention was drawn to two important resistance movements that have often accepted violence as a pragmatic political strategy, as well as two other equally significant resistance movements that, in contrast, insist on a nonviolent strategy of action. In the discussion of the four focal resistance movements rings the common idea of a lesser power against a higher power, and the nonviolent method of resistance is the overall superior method to take steps towards a lasting solution.

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