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The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon

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In Thomas Pynchon’s novel The Crying of Lot 49, we meet Oedipa Maas; she travels down a rabbit hole of her own making, like Lewis Carrols Alice, from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Where Alice comes to self realization, Oedipa’s life ends up falling apart as she becomes more and more isolated and ends up with no closure. She goes through her life, in this story, assigning importance to things that may not be important at all, making a picture into a puzzle. In Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Alice is thrown into situations in a strange world where she believes she can make sense of it all but always ends up frustrated. She is given puzzles to solve comparative to Oedipa’s clues for her great mystery. Some of these puzzles were the Caucus run with the mouse and other animals, the Mad Hatter’s riddle and the croquet game at the queen’s castle. All of these puzzles ended with no answers. She unlike Oedipa realizes that there is no logic to be made from any of these situations. She begins to understand that while life may give you situations that may seem familiar and easy to figure out they may have no answer. Oedipa’s failure to understand how characters try to communication with her and really understand her task at hand causes disorder in her own life, which is what, causes her to continue spiraling down her “rabbit hole”. Just like chaos theory it will break her apart into she is at her most simplistic form, alone without closure.
Thomas Pynchon introduces the novel by describing the stereotypical housewife, she goes to Tupperware parties and comes home and cooks dinner and makes drinks for her husband. Clearly no sign of chaos in this situation, much like Alice who becomes bored with her books and d...

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...ich side of the mushroom to eat. Alice doesn’t identify what his direction means and chooses the wrong side once again. The smallest amount of miscommunication can cause drastic change as Alice learns and grows large once again.

Works Cited:
1. Pynchon, Thomas. The Crying Of Lot 49 .United States, Harper Collins Publishers 1999. Print. Page 8
2. Carroll, Lewis. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, New York: MacMillan. (1865) (tablet edition) Chapter 6
3. Pynchon, Thomas. The Crying Of Lot 49 .United States, Harper Collins Publishers 1999. Print. Page 38
4. Pynchon, Thomas. The Crying Of Lot 49 .United States, Harper Collins Publishers 1999. Print. Page 58
5. Carroll, Lewis. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, New York: MacMillan. (1865) (tablet edition)Chapter 9
6. Pynchon, Thomas. The Crying Of Lot 49 .United States, Harper Collins Publishers 1999. Print. Page 96