The Contribution of American Women to the Abolitionist Movement

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The Abolitionist Movement changed the course of the nation. In addition to the eventual emancipation of slaves, it transformed the role of women in American History. During the Abolitionist Movement, it was thought that the duties of women were confined within the home (Boylan 363). While most women of the time agreed with this statement, there were many who did not. This change of attitude started during the Great Awakening (Baker 623). Eliza Wilkinson wrote, “I won’t have it thought that because we are the weaker sex as to bodily strength we are capable of nothing more than domestic concerns” (Goldfield, et al. 171). During this time, society was against women leaving the home. Many of the men who were against slavery were also opposed to women playing a role in society including the Abolitionist Movement (Railton). The women’s participation in the Abolitionist Movement gave them a political standing allowing them to empower themselves and other suppressed people. The contribution of American women to the Abolitionist Movement gave a voice to the “weaker” gender, and it led to the creation of Female Anti-Slavery Societies in Boston, Massachusetts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Concord, Massachusetts. The Abolitionist Movement was a reform movement during the eighteenth century to nineteenth century, which was often called the Anti-Slavery Movement. The goal of this movement was to end the enslavement of Africans in America. Another goal was to end the Atlantic Slave Trade (Harrold). North America contributed only four percent of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade. The banning of the slave trade did not cause the emancipation of African slaves in America (Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade). However, the Abolitionist Movement played a... ... middle of paper ... ...n File, 2007. Web. 26 Oct. 2011. Soderlund, Jean R. “Priorities and Power: The Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society.” The Abolitionist Sisterhood. Ed. Jean Fagan Yellin and John C. Van Horne. Ithaca: Cornell University, 1994. 67-90. Print. Rpt. of Priorities and Power: The Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society. N.p.: n.p., n.d. Swerdlow, Amy. “Abolition’s Conservative Sister’s: The Ladies’ New York City Anti-Slavery Societies.” The Abolitionist Sisterhood . Ed. Jean Fagan Yellin and John C. Van Horne. Ithaca: Cornell University, 1994. 31-44. Print. Rpt. of Abolition’s Conservative Sister’s: The Ladies’ New York City Anti-Slavery Societies. N.p.: n.p., n.d. 31-44. Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade. Emory University, 2009. Web. 16 Jan. 2012. . Watts, Liz. “Lydia Maria Child.” Journalism History 35.1 (2009): 12-22. Print.

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