The Constitutional Convention: The Curpose Of The Constitutional Convention

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Constitutional Convention The Constitutional Convention was established in Philadelphia on May 24, 1787 (A New Nation Notes). The purpose of the Constitutional Convention was for the colonies to revise the Articles of Confederation (A New Nation Notes). The Convention was also used to establish unity within the colonies and to establish a new central government between the colonies (Teaching American History). Seventy four delegates were invited to attend, but only fifty five delegates were at the Convention, with only Rhode Island refusing to attend. The Convention discussed topics such as how to elect the president and the terms and conditions of presidency, separation of powers, proportional representation, the creation of the Bill of Rights,…show more content…
This plan was the opposite of the Virginia Plan which favored larger states. He proposed one vote for both large and small states on behalf of an equal representation (Teaching American History). This proposition arises a revision in the Articles of Confederation and thus the plan was defeated after three days of review due to lack of support (A New Nation Notes). Alexander Hamilton introduced his own plan on June 18,1787 known as, Hamilton’s Plan. He believed the New Jersey Plan was “duplicating the defects of the Articles and thus failed to address the source of the problem…[and that] the Virginia Plan didn’t go far enough” (Teaching American History). So as a result, he discussed the idea of adopting British style rule. He wanted the governors of the states to be appointed by the national government inside of independent state vote. Hamilton believed in power of men, especially to that of a ruler of the country should be able to have an extended term of servitude (Teaching American History). The Electoral College was discussed regarding presidential servitude to go against Hamilton 's Plan for a king’s…show more content…
They were officially signed into law by President Adams in 1798. These laws were focused on deporting foreigners and making it difficult for immigrants to vote (U.S. History). Within these acts, the Naturalization Act was formed. It stated that in order to vote as an immigrant, an immigrant would need to be a resident for five years. This law was then changed to fourteen years (U.S. History). Under these acts, the Alien Friends Act was created. It allowed for the President to imprison or deport any immigrant considered dangerous to the United States (A New Nation Notes). The Alien Enemies Act was similar to the Alien Friends Act in that the President could deport or imprison any immigrant male above the age of fourteen during times of war that seemed dangerous. The Sedition Act restricted speech within aliens in favor of the federal government. These acts expired in 1801 (A New Nation
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