The Consequences Of Revenge In William Shelley's Frankenstein

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Victor and the creature both seek revenge against one another and by doing so this creates the destruction within the novel. Soon after William’s death, Justine is executed. In response to this, Victor becomes increasingly depressed. Victor reflects on the past events that led up to William and Justine’s deaths: When I reflected on his crimes and malice, my hatred and revenge burst all bounds of moderation. I would have made a pilgrimage to the highest peak of the Andes, could I when there have precipitated him to their base. I wished to see him again, that I might wreak the utmost extent of abhorrence on his head and avenge the deaths of William and Justine. (Shelley 88) William and Justine’s deaths cause imbalance within Victor’s psyche and…show more content…
The creature is projecting his self-hatred onto Victor and blames his creator for society 's lack of inclusiveness and understanding. The creature’s lack of despair demonstrates a repressed superego when his true emotions are overtaken by revenge. This encounter causes the creature’s id to be the dominant aspect of his personality and therefore he has the urge to seek revenge. By seeking revenge against Victor and the De Lacey’s, the creature’s anger is projected and his id will be at rest. Subsequently after the creature and Victor’s meeting, Frankenstein promises to create a mate for the creature. One night, Victor sees the creature at the window of his laboratory and immediately destroys his work. The creature is angered because of Victor’s broken promise and threatens his creator: “‘You can blast my other passions, but revenge remains - revenge, henceforth dearer than light or food! I may die, but first you, my tyrant and tormentor, shall curse the sun that gazes on your misery… Man, you shall repent of the injuries you inflict.’” (Shelley 160, 161) Earlier in the novel the creature’s revenge was expansive, directed at Victor and society, but Victor’s broken promise…show more content…
In Zimmerman’s critical essay that analyses Victor’s childhood using psychoanalytic perspective, the author illustrates how Victor’s mother and father abandon him as a child: “Just as the monster is abandoned by Victor, so too Victor is abandoned--psychically and emotionally--by his ostensibly “doting” parents, who never acknowledge or strive to accommodate his inner world, and instead inflict their own version of reality on him.” (Zimmerman 2) Due to his mother’s death, Victor experiences parental abandonment at a young age. Victor’s father is unsupportive in his scientific interests and pressures Victor into marrying Elizabeth, who was orphaned as a young girl and taken into the Frankenstein household. Due to the parental abandonment he experiences, Victor’s unconscious mind is unsettled because of his negative childhood experiences and memories. By creating life from death, Victor attempts to rectify his mother’s death and make peace with his traumatic childhood. In view of that fact that Victor’s parents imposed their reality onto him, Frankenstein was unable to think without restriction. Victor’s time of trouble occurs when he gives life to the creature, and without the capacity to think his way through problems he subsequently abandons his creation similarly to how his parents emotionally abandoned him. In Adams’` journal article on
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