The Collapse of the Tsarist Regime in 1917 and Its Ties to the First World War

661 Words3 Pages
The Collapse of the Tsarist Regime in 1917 and Its Ties to the First World War There are two views on this, the first one says that the Tsarist regime was doomed from the start with the increasing strikes, poor conditions for the majority of the population and that the war only speeded up the process but did not cause it. The second view is that the Tsarist regime was basically stable up to 1914 despite the problems as it was slowly making progress to becoming a modern state, but the war stopped it dead in its tracks. The first view says that from the beginning of his reign the Tsar said himself that he knew nothing of how to rule an empire so large. From the chaos of Bloody Sunday the Tsar had a chance to reform his ways and share out his power in the Duma. However it soon became obvious that the Tsar still believed that he should own all the power. The Duma was unable to pass any laws without the Tsars approval and could also be dismissed by him at any time without question giving it very little power. The Fundamental laws agreed to the existence of the Duma but it only managed to pass laws to give workers accident insurance and measures to do with the armed forces. For every 90,000 workers there was one representative where as there was one representative for every 2000 nobles meaning that the 1% of nobles elected 2/3 of the representatives in the third Duma. Workers were still not allowed to strike for better wages or working conditions as shown in the Lena massacre in 1912 where workers went on strike for better working conditions. The employers called in the police who opened fired at the protestors showing that the workers still had no rights. The workers were still living in the same appalling conditions and there was economic downturn after 1912. Stolypins land reforms allowed 15% of peasants to get lots of high quality land to become kulaks and left the rest landless and very

More about The Collapse of the Tsarist Regime in 1917 and Its Ties to the First World War

Open Document