preview

The Code Talkers: The Indian New Deal By John Collier

explanatory Essay
1582 words
1582 words
bookmark

The collective programs to reform and assimilate Native American’s under the lead of John Collier was deemed the “Indian New Deal.” John Collier was an American social philanthropist who took an interest in reforming and preserving Indian culture in America. He was eventually assigned the position of Commissioner of the Bureau of Indian Affairs by Franklin D. Roosevelt. The overall goal of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the American government, was to assimilate the native populations and to “Americanize” the Indian way of life. Although John Collier supported the plan of assimilation, his ideas, programs, and policies leaned toward the acculturation of Native Americans instead. Of the many programs and policies created under the authority …show more content…

In this essay, the author

  • Explains that john collier's programs to reform and assimilate native americans were deemed the "indian new deal." the indian reorganization act had disastrous effects on many tribes.
  • Explains that new mexico had the highest casualty rate of the 48 u.s. states during world war ii.
  • Explains that new mexico had the highest casualty rate of any other state in the continental united states during world war ii.
  • Explains that the "code talkers" were a group of navajo men who served in the united states marine corps.
  • Describes wendell chino's role in improving the lives of the mescalero.
  • Explains that wendell chino was a half mescalero and half chiricahua indian who helped unify an already impoverished people. the "indian new deal" enacted programs and policies that would limit economic opportunities and hinder any further social and economic development for tribal peoples.
  • Describes the effects of the indian gaming regulatory act of 1988 on new mexico. who benefited most?
  • Explains that the indian gaming regulatory act of 1988 allowed gambling on reservation land. it made new mexico an even larger tourist attraction than the art communities and beautiful landscape.

Their purpose was to help Allied forces communicate through a secret code they had developed which utilizes the Navajo language. The “Code Talkers” were instrumental in the United States victory of World War II due to the fact that their code could not be broken. The Navajo language, and the languages of pretty much every indigenous people within the United States is not known outside of the U.S. In fact, besides the native speakers, the Indian languages were not known in the United States either, meaning the majority were not written or spread by other tribes, Anglo Americans, Hispanos, or anyone. This meant the “Code Talkers” were able to develop a practically unbreakable code by using code words in the Navajo language to substitute the name of objects, missions, objectives, places, and ideas: The code they had developed was so successful, even speakers of the Navajo language could not decipher it. The twenty-nine “Code Talkers” were from the reservation that spans from New Mexico to Arizona, therefore they are the descendants of the same Navajo people whom the federal government forcibly moved in the efforts to bring their extinction. This is ironic because those twenty nine Navajo men served their country proudly, the same country who suppressed their ancestor’s decades ago, but indeed it was for a cause greater that surpassed the resentment that many Navajo still harbored. If it …show more content…

The law categorized gambling into three classes and depending on the class gambling could be done freely, done with the approval of the National Indian Gaming Commission, or done with the approval of whatever state the reservation is in. The Indian Gaming Regulatory Act had a great effect on New Mexico, as well as the Indian communities who chose to participate, and even those that didn’t. The Indian Gaming Regulatory Act made New Mexico an even larger tourist attraction than the art communities and beautiful landscape had and brought millions of dollars that would aid the tribes and further the economic development on tribal lands. The funds made from the casinos helped Natives lose the title of second class citizen and bring much needed social equality between Indian and non-Indian peoples. Of those tribes who benefited the most from the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act were the Mescalero Apache Tribe who were amongst the first to construct casinos and profit from them immensely. Many tribes chose to participate in gaming because they had no other economic opportunities available to them, but a few chose not to. An example of those who chose not to benefit from the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act were the Navajo and Hopi

Get Access