The Civil Rights Movement

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The civil rights movement comprised efforts of grassroots activists and national leaders to obtain for African Americans the basic rights guaranteed to American citizens in the Constitution. The key players in succeeding with the civil rights movement were the soldiers returning from the war, Martin Luther King Jr, Malcolm X, The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and the anti-Vietnam War activists.

During the civil rights movement, nearly every African American had experienced segregation at lunch stands. In a Journal by Melvin Small, she stated, “Just as with the segregated buses in Montgomery, Alabama the African-American community, especially the segment of college students, had once again reached its saturation point of inequality (Small).” To uphold the nonviolent protest issued by King, college students throughout the South nonviolent sat the lunch counters of various segregated variety stores (Pike). It was not an easy task because these students were confronted with great difficulty. They endured tear gas, police guns, arrests and jail sentences which were all in the name of justice (Pike). A lot of students were dismissed from school for their contribution in the movement. Whole student bodies at several of the colleges marched out in protest, withstanding the intimidation of the police force. Again, King’s belief in the power of unity was exemplified. The movement gained national attention. With this, city officials tried to divert its focus. They accused King for perjury. King faced at least ten years in prison. Although the attempt was unsuccessful and King was found not guilty, the movement did not falter. The sit-in movement, specifically nonviolent resistance, was a great success. Integration w...

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...he black community. It was not easy for King and others to take the stand that they faced but without a doubt, worked together for the good of the country.

Works Cited

Hall, Mitchell K. "The Vietnam Era Antiwar Movement." Organization of American Historians 18.5 (2004): 13-17. Print.

Höhn, Maria, and Martin Klimke. A Breath of Freedom: the Civil Rights Struggle, African American GIs, and Germany. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010. Print.

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. 1st ed. Vol. 1. Oregon: Oregon Volunteers, 2005. Print.

Pike, Brett. "DISCRIMINATION AGAINST AFRICAN AMERICAN SOLDIERS IN WORLD WAR II: RACIAL POLICIES AND THE MARCH TO DESEGREGATION." Apr.-May 2011. Web.

Shawki, Ahmed. Black Liberation and Socialism. Chicago, IL: Haymarket, 2006. Print.

Smalll, Melvin. "Journal of Peace Research." Sage Publications, Ltd. 24.2 (1987). Print.
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