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The Child, the School, the Parent: The Early Years

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Teachers are responsible for creating an environment in which each child is valued. In working to create a safe, respected and valued environment in the classroom and in the playground teachers must recognise that every child is an individual. Teachers must value the cultural background of every child and teach children to respect each other. Encouragement of children to recognise their own and other’s special needs is an important factor in developing positive relationships. Positive relationships between adults and children; amongst children; amongst teachers; between teachers and families and wider community, add to the vitality of the school environment and outside the classroom. Primary schools are an integrated part of their local communities. School communities help shape the direction and culture of the school. The partnerships developed between the school and the wider community help to foster the education programs of the school. (The Child, the School, the Parent: The Early Years, 2004) Parents also play an important role as it their duty to make sure their child is happy at the school they are at and to make sure that their child is not getting bullied. Parents are responsible for their child to have healthy food to eat at school and enough food for the day. Parents also must communicate with their child’s teacher and make sure their child is keeping up to date with homework and discuss any achievements or issues their child has. (Alan Scott, 2000) One of the many roles the teacher takes on in the school is liaising with their students’ parents. The teacher is also responsible for creating a nurturing and safe environment, and encouraging the students to learn and enjoy themselves at school. (Clare Kosnik, 2009). “...

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...acher. It takes more than just modelling definite behaviours, it is bringing one’s entire self to total attention. This refers to a complex combination of hearing, observing, seeing, paying close attention, taking notice, and at the same time understanding what action is required in the situation and making sure that is genuine and empathetic. To develop class cohesion and to build a positive classroom culture requires an authentic ‘learning partnership’. This is enabled by cooperation of the curriculum and focus on planning and programming. A lot depends on the teacher’s abilities in creating the sorts of classroom connections that allow learning conversations between teacher and students and amongst the students themselves. These conversations allow for significant dialogue, which in term helps children make sense of their learning. (Susan Groundwater-Smith, 2011)