The Case For Reparations By Cliedy Coates Summary

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The article “The Case for Reparations” is a point of view that Ta-nehisi Coates looks into the life of Clyde Ross and what he went through in the African American society. Arranging reparations based off of what Clyde Ross lived through and experienced from the time he was a young child to his later adult years. Providing life facts and events comparing them to today and seeking out to present his reparations. Clyde ross explain that we are still living bound down as blacks to the white supremacy and in a new era of racism .Concluding the article the fact that it’s been far too long to live the way we are and it is time for a change to finally be made. Through Clyde Ross life Ta-nehisi is making known that to all the white supremacy, the ones…show more content…
And Jesus is letting them know to remember that you were once slaves and He covered and protected them now they do the same for others that are in the same position as them. Telling them don’t turn their hearts hard or give them their back. And he places this in the article to try to paint the view of blacks where enslaved , had everything taken , and still not giving the right treatment or acknowledgement , so now it’s time for the right return according to what he pulled out of the word. But the scripture from the bible actually in my eyes have nothing to don’t with white supremacy, yes if you pull words of the bile and put it together to fit the situation you need, then yes it will work. But the overall about the scripture from Deuteronomy 15 is Jesus talking and giving a teaching to the former slaves of…show more content…
“Built at the turn of the century, Parchman was supposed to be a progressive and reformist response to the problem of “Negro crime.” In fact it was the gulag of Mississippi, an object of terror to African Americans in the Delta. In the early years of the 20th century, Mississippi Governor James K. Vardaman used to amuse himself by releasing black convicts into the surrounding wilderness and hunting them down with bloodhounds. “Throughout the American South,” writes David M. Oshinsky in his book Worse Than Slavery, “Parchman Farm is synonymous with punishment and brutality, as well it should be … Parchman is the quintessential penal farm, the closest thing to slavery that survived the Civil War.” An selection from the article that makes the deep down inside of your stomach curl up and be disgusted with the white man laws and puts you in a position to compare and look at today’s reoccurring events and see that there aren’t any difference or type of changes that have been made. Still to this very day seeing the generations of blacks enslaved to the white law no matter what title we might have, what color suite we wear, what our graduation certificate says on it or the city where we were born and raised
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