preview

The Birth of the United States from the Colonies

explanatory Essay
1475 words
1475 words
bookmark

During the time period from 1765 to 1800, the government of the Colonies and eventually that of the United States, dealt with countless issues to create the system which governs the citizens of the United States today. Starting in 1765 with the passage of the Stamp Act by the British monarchy up to 1798 with the election of Thomas Jefferson as President in 1800 by the Colonial government, the aforesaid government, fought to rid itself of constant threats to the liberties and freedoms of the American people and the greater good as well as to preserve its intended purpose for as long as it is able. Political leaders such as Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, John Adams, and Alexander Hamilton all had concerns about competing interests that would weaken the government and were adamant in their efforts to prevent it from being crushed under the weight of its own problems. The United States system of government has always had one purpose and one purpose only: to serve the people and strive for the best interest of the public good, rather than that of those in the White House (Document A). Without this crucial principle to stand upon, the Republic of the United States would never have been formed. The American people, who “governed” the Republic, would never have had a say in their government. The government of the United States was formed upon the principle to serve the salus populi and to never let the any one branch, the Executive, Legislative, or the Judicial get more power than any other. A system of checks and balances was created for this reason, and even though it limited the powers of the government, it helped to sustain a level of equality between citizens and government in the country and prevent America from spiraling back ... ... middle of paper ... ...ringing about the realization that there were no major differences of opinion on the purpose and limits of the government among these men and others. They all agreed that every proposition and law passed to keep a balance of power would need to benefit the public good. After many obstacles, the formation government of the Union and the United States was coming full circle. With so many working together to promote good will for all, there could only be one outcome: a remarkable government. After defeating the British and breaking the once seemingly permanent bond with them, the new country and its people were finally “free”. Even though no government was perfect and there were still rules and limits to power and a great number of future bumps in the road, with people such as Jefferson as guides, the government of the Union, for a period at least, was one of the best.

In this essay, the author

  • Explains that the government of the colonies and eventually the united states dealt with countless issues to create the system which governs the citizens today.
  • Explains that the united states system of government has always had one purpose: to serve the people and strive for the best interest of the public good.
  • Explains that before and through the revolutionary war, citizens of the colonies had no idea that it was possible to alter or abolish their government if, for any reason, it overstepped the boundaries of its power.
  • Explains that the british parliament repealed the stamp act and townshend acts in 1766. the massachusetts circular letter sparked colonial boycotts of british goods.
  • Explains that even after the revolution, the union and its new government were limited and censored. the constitution was ratified by all states, but not without a bill of rights.
  • Explains that even with the constitution and bill of rights ratified, the union was still in turmoil; this time it was about finances.
  • Analyzes how jefferson's election became the first peaceful transfer of power from one president to another and symbolized the purpose of government in helping the public good.
  • Explains that jefferson's presidency helped in bringing about the realization that there were no major differences of opinion on the purpose and limits of the government.
  • Describes how the union and the united states formed a remarkable government after defeating the british and breaking the once seemingly permanent bond with them.
Get Access