The Bell Jar, by Sylvia Path and Lucy, by Jamaica Kincaid

1847 Words8 Pages
Women haven’t always had the freedom that they have today. Women were supposed to live a certain life even though sometimes they didn’t want to. They had to tend to their husbands at all time, stay home and do housework while still taking care of their children or being pregnant. Women were abused physically, emotionally, and psychologically. Although women were perceived to act and present themselves in a certain way, some young women went against the cult of the true woman hood not only to be different, but to escape he physical, emotional, and psychological abuse that they will or have encountered. In novels, The Bell Jar, by Sylvia Path and Lucy, by Jamaica Kincaid both young women have the similarity to rebel against the cult of true women hood but do it in many different ways. In the novel, The Bell Jar, by Sylvia Plath the protagonist is named Esther Greenwood. Through the book Esther wonders if she should marry and live a conventional domestic life, or attempt to satisfy her ambition. Esther is from Massachusetts who goes to New York as a college student who is working for a month to be a guest editor for a magazine. She and the other eleven girls are pampered all the time. She has two friends who worry her, Betsey is very perky, but Doreen is very rebellious. Esther once goes on a date with a man named Marco who tries to rape her, but doesn’t succeed. This is something that can have an emotional, psychological, physical, personal, and social effect on someone and their day to day living. After having all of this happen to her with Marco and her two friends she says “Look what can happen in this country, they’d say. A girl lives in some out-of-the-way town for nineteen years, so poor she can’t afford a magazine, and the... ... middle of paper ... ... were from two different cultures they both have similarities Women haven’t always had the freedom that they have today. Women were abused physically, emotionally, and psychologically. Although women were perceived to act and present themselves in a certain way, some young women went against the cult of the true woman hood not only to be different, but to escape he physical, emotional, and psychological abuse that they will or have encountered. The containment they felts they overcame or made better for themselves. In novels, The Bell Jar, by Sylvia Path and Lucy, by Jamaica Kincaid both young women portrayed their stories, lives, and culture in many different ways, but with some of the same themes. Works Cited Kincaid, Jamaica. Lucy. New York: Farrar Straus Giroux, 1990. Print. Plath, Sylvia. The bell jar. [1st U.S. ed. New York: Harper & Row, 1971. Print.

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