The Battle of Paducah

3054 Words13 Pages
The Battle of Paducah For many years "The Battle of Paducah" has been grossly under-stated. There is no mention of the battle in most history books. The latest Kentucky History book has no mention of the battle at all. Without a doubt, Paducah has been overshadowed by the massacre at Fort Pillow on April 12, 1864, some eighteen days later. In fact, if the Battle of Paducah had not turned out the way it did, the Massacre at Fort Pillow may have never taken place. With over thirty-thousand rounds exchanged between the Union and Confederate forces, and the death of one of the South's foremost Colonels, the "skirmish" at Paducah's significance should not be overlooked. . On March 1, 1864, a man with a battle record that few could imagine began planning to recruit troops and mounts from West Kentucky. This man fought at battles such as Fort Donelson and Shiloh. He also served under General Bragg and General Sooy Smith. He is none other than General Nathan Bedford Forrest. (herein referred to as Forrest). On March 1, 1864 three Kentucky regiments received orders from General Forrest asking them to join his force around Columbus, Mississippi. The Third, Seventh, and Eighth Regiments immediately went up the Tombigbee River and joined Forrest's forces. These Kentucky regiments had been badly damaged in the many hard fought battles they had already experienced. Word that they were going back to their home state of Kentucky came as a great comfort. Upon arriving, some of the men found that they would have to walk because of the lack of mounts; not a complaint could be heard. One may ask why Forrest would want such a worn and tattered regiment. To put it simply, he wanted to advance into West Kentucky and who knew th... ... middle of paper ... ...e, 1880 -- 1901), 607. Fred G. Neuman, "Paducah was Scene of Blood and Terror 68 Years Ago Today, As Battle of City Was Fought", Paducah Sun, 25 March 1932. Ibid., 548. Wooten, Interview. U.S. War Department. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, vol. 32, part I (Washington D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1880 -- 1901), 548. Ibid. Neuman, Paducahans in History, 66. Hall Allen, "It has been 100 Long Years since the Battle of Paducah" , Paducah Sun -- Democrat, 22 march 1964. Wooten, Interview. Craig, "The Battle of Paducah" E1. U.S. War Department. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, vol. 32, part I (Washington D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1880 -- 1901), 549.

More about The Battle of Paducah

Open Document