The Battle of New Orleans' Relevance to Today's Army

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This paper will provide information on The Battle of New Orleans and its relevance to today’s Army. Research was derived from several reliable internet sources such as www.militaryhistory.com and an article from The National Geographic online database. Many think that the Battle of New Orleans between the United States and Britain was uncalled for. The Treaty of Ghent, signed in late 1814, ended the War of 1812. Even though the treaty was established prior to the beginning of the Battle of New Orleans, communication was proven faulty, delayed, and ineffective. The Battle of New Orleans' Relevance to Today's Army The Battle of New Orleans was a major battle in the War of 1812. The Battle of New Orleans was a devastating blow for the British. The United States’ triumph of this battle amplified nationalism, and Andrew Jackson became known as an American idol. This paper will provide a detailed background on the Battle of New Orleans, a view on why this monumental battle is significant to today’s Army, and a discussion of Andrew Jackson’s leadership. The Battle of New Orleans lasted from December 23, 1814 through January 8, 1815. It was a battle fought during the War of 1812 (1812-1815). The location of the battle was in Chalmette Battlefield. This battlefield was located south, down river from New Orleans. The United States Army was led by Major General Andrew Jackson also known as “Old Hickory”. He was given that nickname because of his toughness. The United States Army consisted of roughly 3,500 to 5,000 men. The United States Army developed from the 7th US Infantry; a mixture of militia; Baratarian pirates; free Blacks and Native Americans. The British Army was led by Major General Edward Pakenham and Admiral Sir Alexander Coc... ... middle of paper ... ...as a chief that was respected because of his personal afflictions, his absolute value of his troops, and his commitment to prevail against the unruly British. Today’s Army is full of diversity and sometimes division. Embarking and embracing our common patriotism and fighting for the same basis can only strengthen the United States Army. The Battle of New Orleans, a GREAT lesson learned. Works Cited Greene, A. W. (2000). The Battle of New Orleans. In (Ed.), The Heritage of Daniel Haston (p. nl). Retrieved from http://www.danielhaston.com/history/war-1812/neworleans-battle.htm. Hickman, K. (n.d.). The War of 1812: The Battle of New Orleans. Available from http://militaryhistory.about.com/od/warof1812/p/battle-of-new-orleans.htm Kessler, B. (n.d.). The Battle of New Orleans. Available from http://education.nationalgeographic.com/education/media/battle-new-orleans

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