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The Asimovian Way

Powerful Essays
The Asimovian way consists of three elements, science-fiction, technology, and the future. With the great writing ability that he has, through science-fiction Asimov shows his readers how creative he can be. A fantastic example would be his Foundation series. Those books take place three-thousand years in the future on different planets with galactic empires. Stories like that obviously demand a great amount of creativity. Also, the way Asimov shows what he thinks of technology through his style of writing is unique. The way he writes his books helps a wide audience of readers be able to read his books about technological advancements, molecules, or even complex mathematics. In addition to that, Asimov’s science-fiction novels are set in the immediate and far future on distant planets circling other suns. All in all, Isaac Asimov uses a unique style to portray his elaborate views on subjects of technology, science fiction, and the future.
Asimov makes his science fiction books easy and a blast to read. “On the whole, however, he has done more than anyone else to give scientifically illiterate readers a feeling for the excitement and accomplishments of modern science” (Jonas, “No” 28). Also the way of Asimov’s style of writing can be shown through what Donald Watt had to say: “Asimov’s characterizations dramatize and give life to the significance of science fiction…. The real Asimovian hero is the person who looks critically at his society, its technology, and himself—and is eager to modify, to learn, to improve” (50). In addition to what was said by Donald Watt, Asimov’s characters, in his science fiction novels, are always at the center of attention because they refine and rejuvenate the science-fiction world Asimov brings into ...

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...er, 1977. 13-31. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism. Ed. Jean C. Stine. Vol. 26. Detroit: Gale, 1983. 39-41. Print.
Moore, Maxine. "Asimov, Calvin, and Moses." Voices for the Future. Ed. Thomas D. Clareson. N.p.: Press, 1976. 88-103. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism. Ed. Dedria Bryfonski. Vol. 9. Detroit: Gale, 1978. 49-52. Print.
Warrick, Patricia S. "Science Fiction Images of Computers and Robots." The Cybernetic Imagination in Science Fiction. N.p.: MIT, 1980. 53-79. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism. Ed. Jean C. Stine. Vol. 26. Detroit: Gale, 1983. 53-56. Print.
Watt, Donald. "A Galaxy Full of People: Characterization in Asimov's Major Fiction." Isaac Asimov. Ed. Joseph D. Olander and Martin Harry Greenburg. New York: Taplinger, 1977. 135-73. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism. Ed. Jean C. Stine. Vol. 26. Detroit: Gale, 1983. 45-50. Print.
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