The Art Of Verbal Communication Through The Use Of Speech Therapy

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Hearing impaired children should be taught the art of verbal communication through the use of speech therapy. We live in a hearing world where speech is the main form of our daily language. Verbal communication is the norm expected when interacting in public places, such as the grocery store, attending church, or shopping at the mall. The author, Ella Frances Sanders, offers the idea, “Language wraps it understanding and punctuation around us all, tempting us to cross boundaries and helping us to comprehend the impossibly difficult questions that life relentlessly throws at us” (Sanders, Introduction). This daily barrage of questioning often leaves the hearing impaired person experiencing frustration and anger, as they are frequently…show more content…
. . impact on vocational choices” (Effects of Hearing Loss on Development, www.aslha.com). Imagine trying to use sign language as your main form of communication, but prior knowledge of signing from all participants would be necessary for an effective outcome. As children become adults, more opportunities for language interactions occur; handling legal issues, job interviews, and maintaining personal relationships. Usually, no sign language interpreter is available unless prior arrangements were made. Helen Keller, an American author, political activist, and lecturer, the first blind-deaf person to earn a bachelor of arts degree is quoted on the website www.azquotes as saying, “Blindness separates people from things; deafness separates people from people…” (Keller, Helen Keller). Verbal interaction occurs frequently and the desire to be understood by others is a basic human need. It is difficult for the hearing person to understand the total impact being misunderstood continually has on a person’s self-esteem. Speech therapy is an approach chosen by parents to formulate verbal…show more content…
The hearing impaired child’s entire world is impeded by this delay. An additional point advocates of sign language as the main form of communication argue is speech therapy detracts from family time. Parents not only have to take the children to speech therapy, but also need to work with them daily at home. But those parents whose children participate in speech therapy believe it can actually help to form stronger bonds with all members of the family, as they play side by side enjoying games and spending time together.
Authors, McDowell and Day, discuss the importance in their book How to Be a Hero To Your
Kids of spending intentional time with your children and the strong bonds this creates within the family structure stating, “When we are available to our children it says, ‘you are important’ . . . it takes effort-and time-to make people feel important” (143-153). Speech therapy is about teaching people to communicate, an aspect we encounter in every part of our lives. There are scenarios’ in which communication might need to occur and sign language would not be effective. An extreme example might be, a hearing impaired person

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