The 30s

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How would you feel if your family was well-known, but for all of the wrong reasons? Being well-known is not a bad thing, but could lead to bad things. It is not always fun and games either. The Lindbergh family was well-known for the fame, the kidnapping of their child, and the trial. Charles Lindbergh believed he could fly from New York to Paris without stopping. If he made it, Raymond Orteig, a hotel owner, would give him $25,00. Lindbergh was in the air for more than 33 hours. Three thousand six hundred miles later, Lindbergh finally landed at Le Bourget air field in Paris (Roensch, p.8-9). After he landed, he was instantly famous. Lindbergh attended many parties and parades in his honor. He also received many prestigious awards. Presidents, celebrities, and powerful business men wanted to meet him. He received letters, notes, and telegrams with business propositions and marriage proposals daily (Roensch, p. 10). Lindbergh was also popular in Europe. He went on a three month tour to promote the new business of commercial aviation, while on tour, he visited cities in every state. Millions of people came to see him on tour, making him become even more famous. As he got more famous, the press started watching his every move (Roensch, p.12). A few years later, still just as famous, he married Anne Morrow, the U.S. Ambassador to Mexico. They had to arrange a secret wedding, even though the newspaper still found out. Charles and Anne started to go on aerial expeditions all over the world becoming a lot more famous. They decided to settle down and have a baby. Charles Lindbergh Jr, was born on June 22, 1930. Even though Lindbergh asked the media to respect his family, they still started this huge story (Roensch, p13). Once they ha... ... middle of paper ... ...ple took turns sitting on the bench where Lindbergh sat (Oxford, p. 10). After all of the proof was proved, Hauptmann was sentenced to death. After 29 court sessions, 160 witnesses, and 400 exhibits, both sides rested, on Saturday, February 9 (Oxford, p. 11). By night, more than 5,000 people were standing watch outside of the courthouse screaming “kill Hauptmann”. On Wednesday, February 13, Hauptmann was walked to the death chamber and he entered at 8:42. At 8:44, Hauptmann was strapped to the death chair, 2,000 volts of electricity made Hauptmann dead at 8:48 (Oxford, p. 14). The Lindbergh family was well-known for the fame, kidnapping of their son, and the trial. This tragedy created the “Lindbergh Law” which made kidnapping a federal offense. Sometimes being well-known is bad. If your family was well-known for those reasons, you would not want to be well-known.

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