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Texas and Mexico Skirmish against Freedom

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The Fire-eaters( a group of people ) who Favored direct military action against Mexico and said that protection was not enough and wanted a counter-invasion before Mexico invades and took back Texas.1 When Judge Webb failed to open negotiations with Mexico, a “wild scheme” for invading Mexico was discussed in certain circles of the political parties and residence in Texas.2 The relationship between Texas and Mexico was a constant battle to release Texas out of the Mexican hands. The constant battle of armyies and contracts have been bouncing back and fourth to try to reach a solution or a compromise to end the skirmish of between two territory’s. Texas wanted to separate from Mexico and tried to figure it out but Mexico did not agree. Texas went under many trials and tribulations that caused it to have conflicts with Mexico, incited rumors that spread all throughout the republic, and lead to the final act that caused Texas to finally earn its independence.
The conflicts with Mexico was a ongoing and continuous. At the beginning when this was beginning to start the republic of Texas was debating where should the boundary line be. Texas took into there own hands and came up that the boundary line should be “beginning at the mouth of the Sabine River, to the mouth of the Rio Grande, thence up the principal stream of said river to its source.3” There were battles when Mexican troops meet the Texas troops. Texas was always on alert because they were worried of a ambush and a unexpected attack so they had troops ready at all time. On June 17, there was a letter from Rusk to Thomas Jefferson Green, the letter was urging the immediate concentration of there Texas troops to meet a advancing army.4 At that moment though there were only 3...

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...841.. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1963. 10,11,12.
Nance, Joseph Milton. "1 - The Trans-Nueces Country." In After San Jacinto; the Texas-Mexican frontier, 1836-1841.. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1963. 3.
Nance, Joseph Milton. "22 - Frontier Raids, Threats, and Counter-Threats of Invasion." In After San Jacinto; the Texas-Mexican frontier, 1836-1841.. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1963. 481.
Nance, Joseph Milton. "1." In After San Jacinto; the Texas-Mexican frontier, 1836-1841.. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1963. 1-7.
Nance, Joseph Milton. "2." In After San Jacinto; the Texas-Mexican frontier, 1836-1841.. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1963. 12.
"REPUBLIC OF TEXAS." NANCE, JOSEPH MILTON. https://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/mzr02 (accessed May 2, 2014).
Bee, Bee. Letter to Bee. 1839. Photograph. The Republic of Texas, Austin.
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